Porn Addiction Study Takes A Whack At ‘Fapstronauts’ (INFOGRAPHIC)

Healthy Living – The Huffington Post
Porn Addiction Study Takes A Whack At ‘Fapstronauts’ (INFOGRAPHIC)
Watching porn can certainly have a negative effect on your sex life. According to a survey of the NoFap community, a group of people who are attempting to quit masturbating to online pornography, 49 percent of the self-titled “Fapstronauts” have never had sex with another person. Additionally, 59 percent say they watched porn between four and 15 hours a week before swearing it off.

In an effort to call attention to the problem, ProjectKnow.com, a resource site for learning about addictions of all types, has taken the raw data from an April, 2012, “Fapstronaut” survey and produced the infographic below.

Lip Balm Can Replace Lubricant, Shoeshine And Much More
The weather is getting colder and your lips are inevitably getting a bit dry. That means you’re probably stocking up on your favorite lip balm to help get you through the season. But did you know that when you’re a bind, this little tube can be used in place of some common household items? Well, it’s true — scroll through our list to see what we mean.

Lubricant

Get your minds out of the gutter and on your furniture. If your drawers or windows stick a little, run some chapstick along the tracks for a smoother opening.

Residue Remover

There are a ton of tricks you can try to remove sticky goo from surfaces, but ditch everything else and try a little lip balm for stubborn gum and labels.

Shoeshine

If you’re about to go out to a fancy party and you realize your shoes could use a little help, reach for the salve. Just clean any dust off, then apply and buff with a cloth.

Scratch Remover

Some of us still have CDs, and when those relics get a little scratched, it can be very, very annoying. If you find yourself in this situation, apply some chapstick to the area and buff. This may only work for minor nicks.

Hair Gel

We’re not saying this is really going to make you look, well, dapper. But if you find yourself with an Alfalfa situation, try a little balm on your hair.

Click through our slideshow to see other new uses for ordinary things.

Have something to say? Check out HuffPost Home on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr and Instagram.

**

Do you have a home story idea or tip? Email us at homesubmissions@huffingtonpost.com. (PR pitches sent to this address will be ignored.)

Your Weekly Travel Zen: Hawaii
166723286

HuffPost’s newest addition, HuffPost Hawaii, was launched earlier this month. As September comes to a close, we’re celebrating Hawaii as this week’s Moment of Travel Zen. Of the 50th state, HuffPost Hawaii associate editor Chloe Fox says:

Hawaii is physically stunning — that’s no surprise. But the most magical part about being here is not just the blueness of the water, the greenness of the mountains, or the ubiquity of the rainbows. Hawaii is the most remote place on earth — it is the furthest away from any other landmass, which gives it a serene peacefulness, a feeling that nothing in the world can impinge on you or your happiness. It is the ultimate escape and the perfect place to let go of fears, stressors and whatever else is holding you back from truly enjoying and living your life.

Where have you traveled for a moment of zen? Email travel@huffingtonpost.com with your travel zen or submit below.

Check out more stunning photos of Hawaii in the slideshow below!


And to see our past featured Moments of Travel Zen…

Eating Peanut Butter Could Prevent Future Breast Disease
Girls who grow up eating PB&Js could be doing their breast health a favor.

Researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School found an association between regularly eating peanut butter and having a lower risk of developing benign breast disease in early adulthood. Benign breast disease is noncancerous, and occurs when there are changes to the breast or an injury or infection leads to lumps in the breast tissue. The research team did not investigate a link between peanut butter and malignant breast lumps or cancer.

Other sources of vegetable fats and proteins — such as soybeans, beans and lentils — could also have the same effect, but researchers noted that the data on these particular foods in the study was not as abundant as data on peanut butter.

It’s important to note that the study only showed an association between peanut butter consumption and breast disease, and doesn’t show that peanut butter can definitively prevent breast disease.

The study, published in the journal Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, included health data on 9,039 U.S. girls ages 9 to 15 who were recruited to the Growing Up Today Study in 1996. They filled out food-frequency questionnaires once a year from their recruitment year until 2001, and then biennially until 2010.

In 2005, researchers also started keeping track of benign breast disease diagnoses among the study participants, who had entered adulthood and were now between ages 18 and 30. Researchers found that 112 of them had developed the condition.

Researchers found that eating peanut butter twice a week during childhood/adolescences was linked with a 39 percent lower risk of developing benign breast disease, and this effect seemed especially strong among girls who had a family history of breast cancer.

Of course, nuts have a wide range of other health benefits, too. To find out more, click here.

Green – The Huffington Post
Lip Balm Can Replace Lubricant, Shoeshine And Much More
The weather is getting colder and your lips are inevitably getting a bit dry. That means you’re probably stocking up on your favorite lip balm to help get you through the season. But did you know that when you’re a bind, this little tube can be used in place of some common household items? Well, it’s true — scroll through our list to see what we mean.

Lubricant

Get your minds out of the gutter and on your furniture. If your drawers or windows stick a little, run some chapstick along the tracks for a smoother opening.

Residue Remover

There are a ton of tricks you can try to remove sticky goo from surfaces, but ditch everything else and try a little lip balm for stubborn gum and labels.

Shoeshine

If you’re about to go out to a fancy party and you realize your shoes could use a little help, reach for the salve. Just clean any dust off, then apply and buff with a cloth.

Scratch Remover

Some of us still have CDs, and when those relics get a little scratched, it can be very, very annoying. If you find yourself in this situation, apply some chapstick to the area and buff. This may only work for minor nicks.

Hair Gel

We’re not saying this is really going to make you look, well, dapper. But if you find yourself with an Alfalfa situation, try a little balm on your hair.

Click through our slideshow to see other new uses for ordinary things.

Have something to say? Check out HuffPost Home on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr and Instagram.

**

Do you have a home story idea or tip? Email us at homesubmissions@huffingtonpost.com. (PR pitches sent to this address will be ignored.)

A Puppy For My Girl
To Ella,

I am about to make all of your dreams come true. See, this week, while you’re at school — working and playing and weaving your way into a new year as a fourth grader, Daddy and I will kiss you good bye, travel over that great big bridge in the middle of the day and bring home a puppy. Not just any puppy, Miss Ella. Your puppy. The puppy you thought of since you could think. The puppy you researched and read and talked about. The puppy you begged and borrowed and waited for. The puppy you met this summer that bowled you over with his excited kissing and panting and pawing. The puppy that made you look up at us with your giant blue eyes and say “This must be heaven.”

But we were unsure. See, we have a dog. A great big family dog — more like a gentle polar bear than a puppy — but she’s plenty of dog to go around. And we have you, and your two sisters and your two brothers. And we have jobs and schedules and activities and places to be. And we have a yard with a crooked fence and a torn screen door. And we are hurried, scrambling for socks and tossing lunches at each of you, in a frenzy to get out the door each day. And well, we have a way of not really knowing when it’s enough, when to say satisfied and went to say overwhelmed. Just like life, it usually blends all up and comes out right. But still.

Then there is you. You, Miss Ella, are right in the middle of it all. You take your time. You are careful. You are gentle. You are soft. You are just different enough from the rest of the pack. I see it as special. You don’t always. You have cried long, painful bursts of sadness and howled “Everyone is good at things except me. Everyone says ‘Wow! Amazing!’ about the other kids. They are smarter and do better cartwheels and have stronger muscles.” I want to carry on, outraged at this untruth. But I don’t. I just hold you against me — a piece of me lost, a piece of me understanding, all of me accepting that this is your place in the world.

I have tried to help you blaze your own way — horses and kayaks, book clubs and tea parties. Shamelessly, I raise you up. I defend you. I push you to be proud of you. We save piles of handwritten welcome cards celebrating the day you were born and dig into them often. We praise you for reports from teachers and parents and friends — bright, kind, happy. We stand on the corner of the soccer field, cheering and jumping and hugging, on the day of your first goal. It’s not enough. And even though I look at your siblings after their games, surprised and ask “Just one?” And I look at their math facts test and say “Faster!” And I whisper to them on a starry autumn night, “Lead!” You don’t see what they carry because you carry something different. Just like your gifts are different. You are outstanding in the quiet corners of life. You will learn to love that beauty, like I do.

You made me a list: wash, feed, brush, water, walk, scoop, clean. I saw the seriousness in your words, in your eyes. I saw the potential — the power and pride — of owning and caring and working for something other than yourself. Doing something no one else wants to do. I look at you, precious and perfect like a 9-year-old should be. I look at your girlhood peaking, where everything is still possible. I look at you, at what you love, at what makes you light up. It is this puppy. And even though I know it’s deeper — what you will learn, how you will grow — it is this puppy.

So Miss Ella, I hand you the keys to your own heart. Unlock all that is uniquely you and hold it dear. I give you this gift because I believe in you, I believe in your dreams. You will work in sun and rain and snow. You will work in night and day, in the busy, the tired, the frantic. This is your path. Make your way. And for this puppy, his only job, is to help you see the wealth that has been within you, bursting to shine out, all along.

I love you wildly.

Mom

2013-09-05-photoedit.jpg

Good News – The Huffington Post
A Puppy For My Girl
To Ella,

I am about to make all of your dreams come true. See, this week, while you’re at school — working and playing and weaving your way into a new year as a fourth grader, Daddy and I will kiss you good bye, travel over that great big bridge in the middle of the day and bring home a puppy. Not just any puppy, Miss Ella. Your puppy. The puppy you thought of since you could think. The puppy you researched and read and talked about. The puppy you begged and borrowed and waited for. The puppy you met this summer that bowled you over with his excited kissing and panting and pawing. The puppy that made you look up at us with your giant blue eyes and say “This must be heaven.”

But we were unsure. See, we have a dog. A great big family dog — more like a gentle polar bear than a puppy — but she’s plenty of dog to go around. And we have you, and your two sisters and your two brothers. And we have jobs and schedules and activities and places to be. And we have a yard with a crooked fence and a torn screen door. And we are hurried, scrambling for socks and tossing lunches at each of you, in a frenzy to get out the door each day. And well, we have a way of not really knowing when it’s enough, when to say satisfied and went to say overwhelmed. Just like life, it usually blends all up and comes out right. But still.

Then there is you. You, Miss Ella, are right in the middle of it all. You take your time. You are careful. You are gentle. You are soft. You are just different enough from the rest of the pack. I see it as special. You don’t always. You have cried long, painful bursts of sadness and howled “Everyone is good at things except me. Everyone says ‘Wow! Amazing!’ about the other kids. They are smarter and do better cartwheels and have stronger muscles.” I want to carry on, outraged at this untruth. But I don’t. I just hold you against me — a piece of me lost, a piece of me understanding, all of me accepting that this is your place in the world.

I have tried to help you blaze your own way — horses and kayaks, book clubs and tea parties. Shamelessly, I raise you up. I defend you. I push you to be proud of you. We save piles of handwritten welcome cards celebrating the day you were born and dig into them often. We praise you for reports from teachers and parents and friends — bright, kind, happy. We stand on the corner of the soccer field, cheering and jumping and hugging, on the day of your first goal. It’s not enough. And even though I look at your siblings after their games, surprised and ask “Just one?” And I look at their math facts test and say “Faster!” And I whisper to them on a starry autumn night, “Lead!” You don’t see what they carry because you carry something different. Just like your gifts are different. You are outstanding in the quiet corners of life. You will learn to love that beauty, like I do.

You made me a list: wash, feed, brush, water, walk, scoop, clean. I saw the seriousness in your words, in your eyes. I saw the potential — the power and pride — of owning and caring and working for something other than yourself. Doing something no one else wants to do. I look at you, precious and perfect like a 9-year-old should be. I look at your girlhood peaking, where everything is still possible. I look at you, at what you love, at what makes you light up. It is this puppy. And even though I know it’s deeper — what you will learn, how you will grow — it is this puppy.

So Miss Ella, I hand you the keys to your own heart. Unlock all that is uniquely you and hold it dear. I give you this gift because I believe in you, I believe in your dreams. You will work in sun and rain and snow. You will work in night and day, in the busy, the tired, the frantic. This is your path. Make your way. And for this puppy, his only job, is to help you see the wealth that has been within you, bursting to shine out, all along.

I love you wildly.

Mom

2013-09-05-photoedit.jpg

#alkalinity #alkalinitymovement #7.2 #sevenpointtwo

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s