How Technology Is Killing Eye Contact

Healthy Living – The Huffington Post
How Technology Is Killing Eye Contact
Pat Christen had an alarming wake-up call one day about the toll that technology was taking on her life — and her family.

“I realized several years ago that I had stopped looking in my children’s eyes,” the HopeLab President and CEO said at a Huffington Post panel at Ad Week on Tuesday. “And it was shocking to me.”

Her “a-ha” moment was an alarming one, but it’s more common than you might think — and it points toward a larger, and often undiscussed, byproduct of excessive screen time. The decline of eye contact is well-documented, and as we spend more and more of our time staring at screens, there’s less time left over to look into people’s eyes — including the eyes of the people we care about most.

Between staring at computers during the work day and regularly gazing down at our phones, Americans spending more time with their eyes glued to their screens than ever before. According to recent estimates, the average American spends more than five hours per day using digital devices on computers and mobile devices (the number is higher, of course, for those who work in front of computer screens), and another four and a half hours watching television. Additionally, the average mobile user checks his or her phone 150 times a day (that’s every six and a half minutes), and one recent survey found that young people in Britain spend more time each day on average on their phones than with their partners (119 vs. 97 minutes).

A Wall Street Journal article published in May, “Just Look Me In The Eye Already,” cast a light on how technology use has affected our eye contact — and the sizable toll that reducing eye contact during conversations could take on our relationships.

According to Quantified Impressions, a Texas-based communications analytics company, an adult makes eye contact between 30 and 60 percent of the time in a typical conversation, but emotional connection is built when eye contact is made during 60-70 percent of the conversation. In other words, the less eye contact, the less of a connection is made.

The growth of multitasking on mobile devices (i.e. sending email during dinner) and remote working — in which conversations are mostly held over the phone — have normalized the experience of having conversations with little or no eye contact, Noah Zandan, president of Quantified Impressions, told the Wall Street Journal.

“All too often we’re like cornered animals with our eyes darting from device to human and back to device,” Daniel Sieberg, author of “The Digital Diet: The Four-Step Plan To Break Your Tech Addiction And Regain Balance In Your Life,” tells The Huffington Post. “Eye contact can be especially meaningful in today’s world of constant partial attention and it conveys a sentiment that the person you’re with matters. Taking that extra time when possible can really yield benefits with face-to-face interaction.”

However, most of us have become accustomed to conversations where digital devices interrupt eye contact: You’re in a conversation with an acquaintance whose gaze is directed down at a screen while you’re speaking, a friend jumps into the dinner conversation without looking up from the text she’s composing, or you catch yourself nodding along to your daughter’s story while reading an email. These interactions aren’t just what previous generations would have considered rude: They’re also undermining our ability to connect with the people in our lives.

“You’re not going to connect deeply with someone who is distracted,” Daniel Goleman, author of the forthcoming book “Focus,” tells The Huffington Post, explaining that declining eye contact signals that we’re giving less attention to the people we’re communicating with — and in many cases, those are the people we care most about.

The importance of eye contact in human relationships, whether at the workplace or in any other setting, is difficult to underestimate. According to Psychology Today, it’s the “strongest form of nonverbal communication.” And according to a University of Miami study, over 43 percent of the attention we focus on someone is devoted to their eyes. It also plays a critical role in the development of emotional connections.

University of Aberdeen researchers found that when a group of people were presented with photos of two faces that were nearly identical — the only difference was that in one photo, the eyes were looking away, while the other’s eyes looked into the camera — subjects judged the faces with direct gaze to be more attractive and likable, the Telegraph reported.

“Eye contact, although it occurs over a gap of yards, is not a metaphor,” psychiatrists Thomas Lewis, Fari Amini, and Richard Lannon write in “A General Theory Of Love.” “When we meet the gaze of another, two nervous systems achieve a palpable and intimate apposition.”

Largely for this reason, the issue of declining eye contact has become a matter of concern among parents. Recently, comedian Louis C.K. told Conan O’Brien that he wouldn’t be letting his daughters get smartphones.

“I think these things are toxic, especially for kids,” C.K. said. “They don’t look at people when they talk to them and they don’t build empathy.”

Many parents are concerned about what their own digital multitasking and lack of eye contact might be communicating to their children. Like Christen, blogger Rachel Marie Martin had a major realization about how important it was for her to look her children in the eyes.

“Nothing tells another person you matter more than looking at them in the eyes while they talk. It shows that what they are saying truly is important to you,” Martin wrote in a recent blog post, “20 Things I Will Regret Not Doing With My Kids.” “I want my kids to remember that there where times when their mother looked them in the eye and smiled. And for me this often means shutting my laptop, putting down my phone, stopping my list, and just giving them time.”

As Goleman explains, communicating attention in this way is crucial to developing strong relationships, whether between friends, coworkers or parents and their children.

“Full attention,” says Goleman, “is a form of love.”

9 Outdoor Hotel Tubs You Need To Soak In
A room with a view is great… but what about a hot tub with a view?

If you’ve yet to experience the bliss of soaking in a hot tub under the stars with a stunning view of nature, you haven’t lived.

Whether it’s a dip in your skivvies or a private soak au natural, these tubs are a recipe for utter relaxation.

Check out some of our favorite outdoor bathing spots below.

Alila Hotel, Bali

Alila outdoor bathtub

Nimmo Bay Resort, British Columbia, Canada

Waterfall Spa, Nimmo Bay, British Columbia

The Ridge Tahoe Resort Hotel, Lake Tahoe, Nevada

Ridge View hot tub with people

Anantara Dhigu Resort & Spa, Maldives

Bathroom Sunset Beach Villa

The Westin Trillium House, Blue Mountains, Ontario, Canada

The Westin Trillium House, Blue Mountain—Outdoor hot tub

Heritance Kandalama Hotel, Dambulla, Sri Lanka

98840035

Mowani Mountain Camp, Damaraland, Namibia

140497292

Elsa’s Kopje Boutique Safari Lodge, Nairobi, Kenya

126386492

Echo Valley Ranch, British Columbia, Canada

Outdoor Hot Tub at Echo Valley Ranch

Good News – The Huffington Post
Puppies Experiencing Fall For The First Time Will Make Your Heart Explode
Puppies and pumpkins, puppies and pumpkins! It’s too much for our hearts to handle!

Dogs everywhere are loving fall, but there’s something extra special about Golden Retriever puppies experiencing the season for the first time. This video will make you want to grab at your computer screen in an attempt to pick up one of those fur balls for a hug!

If you’re looking for a companion of your own and are ready for the responsibility, take a look at the ASPCA adoption site or Petfinder.com.

Via HooplaHa.

GPS for the Soul – The Huffington Post
How Technology Is Killing Eye Contact
Pat Christen had an alarming wake-up call one day about the toll that technology was taking on her life — and her family.

“I realized several years ago that I had stopped looking in my children’s eyes,” the HopeLab President and CEO said at a Huffington Post panel at Ad Week on Tuesday. “And it was shocking to me.”

Her “a-ha” moment was an alarming one, but it’s more common than you might think — and it points toward a larger, and often undiscussed, byproduct of excessive screen time. The decline of eye contact is well-documented, and as we spend more and more of our time staring at screens, there’s less time left over to look into people’s eyes — including the eyes of the people we care about most.

Between staring at computers during the work day and regularly gazing down at our phones, Americans spending more time with their eyes glued to their screens than ever before. According to recent estimates, the average American spends more than five hours per day using digital devices on computers and mobile devices (the number is higher, of course, for those who work in front of computer screens), and another four and a half hours watching television. Additionally, the average mobile user checks his or her phone 150 times a day (that’s every six and a half minutes), and one recent survey found that young people in Britain spend more time each day on average on their phones than with their partners (119 vs. 97 minutes).

A Wall Street Journal article published in May, “Just Look Me In The Eye Already,” cast a light on how technology use has affected our eye contact — and the sizable toll that reducing eye contact during conversations could take on our relationships.

According to Quantified Impressions, a Texas-based communications analytics company, an adult makes eye contact between 30 and 60 percent of the time in a typical conversation, but emotional connection is built when eye contact is made during 60-70 percent of the conversation. In other words, the less eye contact, the less of a connection is made.

The growth of multitasking on mobile devices (i.e. sending email during dinner) and remote working — in which conversations are mostly held over the phone — have normalized the experience of having conversations with little or no eye contact, Noah Zandan, president of Quantified Impressions, told the Wall Street Journal.

“All too often we’re like cornered animals with our eyes darting from device to human and back to device,” Daniel Sieberg, author of “The Digital Diet: The Four-Step Plan To Break Your Tech Addiction And Regain Balance In Your Life,” tells The Huffington Post. “Eye contact can be especially meaningful in today’s world of constant partial attention and it conveys a sentiment that the person you’re with matters. Taking that extra time when possible can really yield benefits with face-to-face interaction.”

However, most of us have become accustomed to conversations where digital devices interrupt eye contact: You’re in a conversation with an acquaintance whose gaze is directed down at a screen while you’re speaking, a friend jumps into the dinner conversation without looking up from the text she’s composing, or you catch yourself nodding along to your daughter’s story while reading an email. These interactions aren’t just what previous generations would have considered rude: They’re also undermining our ability to connect with the people in our lives.

“You’re not going to connect deeply with someone who is distracted,” Daniel Goleman, author of the forthcoming book “Focus,” tells The Huffington Post, explaining that declining eye contact signals that we’re giving less attention to the people we’re communicating with — and in many cases, those are the people we care most about.

The importance of eye contact in human relationships, whether at the workplace or in any other setting, is difficult to underestimate. According to Psychology Today, it’s the “strongest form of nonverbal communication.” And according to a University of Miami study, over 43 percent of the attention we focus on someone is devoted to their eyes. It also plays a critical role in the development of emotional connections.

University of Aberdeen researchers found that when a group of people were presented with photos of two faces that were nearly identical — the only difference was that in one photo, the eyes were looking away, while the other’s eyes looked into the camera — subjects judged the faces with direct gaze to be more attractive and likable, the Telegraph reported.

“Eye contact, although it occurs over a gap of yards, is not a metaphor,” psychiatrists Thomas Lewis, Fari Amini, and Richard Lannon write in “A General Theory Of Love.” “When we meet the gaze of another, two nervous systems achieve a palpable and intimate apposition.”

Largely for this reason, the issue of declining eye contact has become a matter of concern among parents. Recently, comedian Louis C.K. told Conan O’Brien that he wouldn’t be letting his daughters get smartphones.

“I think these things are toxic, especially for kids,” C.K. said. “They don’t look at people when they talk to them and they don’t build empathy.”

Many parents are concerned about what their own digital multitasking and lack of eye contact might be communicating to their children. Like Christen, blogger Rachel Marie Martin had a major realization about how important it was for her to look her children in the eyes.

“Nothing tells another person you matter more than looking at them in the eyes while they talk. It shows that what they are saying truly is important to you,” Martin wrote in a recent blog post, “20 Things I Will Regret Not Doing With My Kids.” “I want my kids to remember that there where times when their mother looked them in the eye and smiled. And for me this often means shutting my laptop, putting down my phone, stopping my list, and just giving them time.”

As Goleman explains, communicating attention in this way is crucial to developing strong relationships, whether between friends, coworkers or parents and their children.

“Full attention,” says Goleman, “is a form of love.”

Green – The Huffington Post
National Geographic Celebrates 125 Years Of Photographs With The Magazine’s Most Iconic Images
Believe it or not, National Geographic has been around for 125 wonderful years.

The revered travel magazine is celebrating more than a century of publication with a special anniversary issue centered around the awe-inspiring power of photography. From the famed “Afghan Girl” to the breathtaking image of a chimp reaching out to primatologist Jane Goodall, National Geographic has captivated readers and been a beacon for both exploration and conservation.

So take a look at some of the Society’s most iconic images below — they will all be featured in the October issue of National Geographic magazine.

nat geo 3

Brazzaville Zoo, Brazzaville, Republic of Congo

Captive chimpanzee Jou Jou, reaches out its hand to Dr. Jane Goodall.

nat geo 8

2011 | Uganda

A lion climbs a tree to sleep in Uganda’s Queen Elizabeth Park.

nat geo 10

2004 | Canada

Its image mirrored in icy water, a polar bear travels submerged — a tactic often used to surprise prey. Scientists fear global warming could drive bears to extinction sometime this century.

nat geo 11

1996 | South Africa

A lion pushes through a dust storm in Kalahari Gemsbok National Park, South Africa. The weather had worsened to the point that it didn’t notice the photographer’s approach. “I shot three rolls of him and just one picture turned out — serendipity,” says Johns.

nat geo 5

1991 | Kuwait

Under the black clouds of burning oil fields during the Gulf War, camels forage desperately for shrubs and water in southern Kuwait. Front-line photographs of regions ravaged by human strife can also illuminate war’s environmental cost.

nat geo 6

2010 | Dzitnup, Mexico

A single frame can transport us to one of our planet’s far-flung and beautiful places. In this one, stalactites and a sunbeam spotlight a swimmer in the Xkeken cenote, a natural well in the Yucatán thought by the Maya to lead to the underworld.

nat geo 1

1913 | Machu Picchu, Peru

An elevated view of about half of Machu Picchu, the lost mountaintop city of the Inca in the Peruvian Andes. National Geographic supported Bingham’s excavations at the site from 1912 to 1915.

nat geo 2

Texas | 1939

A cowgirl dropped a nickel in a parking meter to hitch her pony. When this photo was taken El Paso was still a highly horse-conscious town with many cattle-ranch residents.

nat geo 4

1984 | Pakistan

Steve McCurry’s iconic photograph of a young Afghan girl in a Pakistan refugee camp appeared on the cover of National Geographic magazine’s June 1985 issue and became the most famous cover image in the magazine’s history.

nat geo 7

2011 | South Dakota

Oglala youths hold an upside-down flag — an international symbol of distress and an act of defiance toward the U.S. government — at a rally to commemorate a 1975 shoot-out between American Indian Movement (AIM) activists and FBI agents. Two agents and one AIM member died; AIM’s Leonard Peltier was jailed for life.

nat geo 9

2010 | Afghanistan

Noor Nisa, about 18, was pregnant and her water had just broken. Her husband was determined to get her to the hospital, but his car broke down, and he went to find another vehicle. The photographer ended up taking Noor Nisa, her mother and her husband to the hospital, where she gave birth to a baby girl.

nat geo 12

2011 | Mumbai, India

Seeking to capture the throng in Churchgate Station, Olson coached a local assistant through the laborious process needed to get this shot, because the perfect vantage point was closed to foreigners. “After four hours we had this picture — and a small victory over Indian bureaucracy.”

nat geo cover

#alkalinity #alkalinitymovement #7.2 #sevenpointtwo

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s