Are You Intimidated by Yoga? Get Over It and Get Into the Practice

GPS for the Soul – The Huffington Post
Are You Intimidated by Yoga? Get Over It and Get Into the Practice
As a yoga studio owner, teacher and devoted student, I meet people all over town — in line at Trader Joe’s, at the nail salon (yes, I’m a yogi and I get mani/pedis), during dismissal at my kids’ school — and they all want to talk about yoga. “How do I get started?” “Can I do it?” “I really should do it.” “I’ve been meaning to come.” “I drive by all the time.” “What is yoga, anyway?”

Yoga is the fastest growing “fitness” trend in America, and it’s big business too. According to a 2012 “Yoga in America” study by Yoga Journal, 20.4 million Americans report that they practice yoga; that number is up by 29 percent from the magazine’s previous study in 2008. Nearly 14 million Americans say a doctor or therapist has recommended yoga to them. Inc. com wrote that yoga is one of the best industries for starting a new business. (But let me set the record straight: This is not a business to make millions in.) CNN Money reported in 2011 that the yoga and Pilates studio scene is expected to hit $6.5 billion. Last week, Lululemon, the Vancouver-based yoga-wear line, projected more than $1.6 billion in revenue for 2013. Lulu’s “Wunder Under” pants retail for $92 (and if you’re reading this post, you probably have at least one pair of these Luon lovelies in your workout drawer right now).

All sorts of products and services, having nothing to do whatsoever with the practice of yoga (banks, cars, sodas, soaps, etc.), use images of people doing yoga in advertisements. Celebrities are routinely pictured by paparazzi coming out of classes, with yoga mats and almond milk lattes in hand. More star athletes are adding yoga to their training regimens (go Andre Ethier, go Dodgers!). Even the U.S. military is using yoga in boot camp (“om in the army”), so now we know it’s not just for sissies anymore. Today, we’re all about mindfulness, meditation and other ancient yogic practices.

And yet, while it appears that absolutely everyone is interested in trying yoga (Yoga Journal calls these folks “aspirational” yogis), many of us are still wary of it. Whether the challenge is physical, psychological, emotional or spiritual, people are still intimidated by yoga. This intimidation comes in many forms: Sometimes people will volunteer statements such as, “I’m intimidated by yoga,” or “Yoga intimidates me,” and “Yoga is intimidating.” Sometimes the fear is more veiled: “What? I can’t even touch my toes” (this is the one I hear most often), “I’m afraid I’ll look stupid,” “I’m injured — I can’t do yoga” (we get this one a lot, too), or “I hate yoga. I can’t still my mind.” “Yoga agitates me — it stresses me out.” Yeah.

Here’s what I tell them: “So what if you can’t touch your toes? That’s what yoga’s for. It helps increase flexibility.” If students are injured, there’s always some sort of Gentle, Therapeutic or Restorative practice for them. Indeed, some systems of yoga are specifically designed for those with injuries; people can learn methods and modifications for adapting postures, providing support and healing with yoga. Can’t still your mind? Neither can I. Most of us can’t. It’s the mind’s job to keep us busy and distracted. Our job is to practice quieting and questioning our thoughts; that’s why it’s called a “practice.”

I hope this helps some of you get over it. But, for the greater skeptics, here’s more info and insight about what you can anticipate and expect from your yoga studio, your teachers and your fellow yogis.

The Studio

First, I always recommend that people start their practice in a studio — not at home, not a gym, not in the rec room at the local public park. Beyond my own business interest, as a long time student and now a teacher, I believe it is best to learn in a setting that’s safe and supportive. Plenty has been written about the “dangers of yoga,” but yoga is safe and beneficial if it’s taught and practiced carefully and correctly. DVDs and inexperienced teachers are no substitute for the real thing; you want someone to guide you, someone who knows what they’re doing.

A good studio provides its students with many choices and options: a wide variety of offerings, different types of classes (for different ages, levels and abilities), multiple methods of payment (class packages, memberships, single classes, community classes at reduced rates etc.) A good studio is open and accessible to as many people who want to practice yoga as possible.

It’s fair to expect your studio to be welcoming, well-run (professional personnel vs., in L.A. for example, “work trade” volunteers wired into their iPhones, who’d rather be auditioning to be an extra in a sitcom than greeting and checking you into yoga class) and clean (floors are swept between classes; blankets are laundered frequently; equipment and props stored neatly; washrooms with refilled toilet paper dispensers).

Yoga is a personal practice. Most people practice local; that is, they choose a studio near their home, in their neighborhood. A place that feels familiar, comfortable and safe. You know, personal. A “home” studio often feels warmer, more inviting than a slick corporate yoga setting, especially for students new to yoga. Find a studio that feels good to you.

The Teachers

Your teachers should be well-trained, experienced in their craft and mature human beings. But beyond education and years on the job, there’s something even more important to look for in your teachers. Are they kind, patient and compassionate? Are they challenging you enough — or pushing too much? Can you relate to and connect with them? Do they care about you?

Training and experience is foremost; but there’s also a magic about certain teachers. Yes, teachers should teach the poses — how to get in and out of them safely, with good alignment; how to be in the poses with both stability and ease; how to best benefit from your Savasana, final resting pose. But the magic comes in between those moments. Great teachers guide us towards seeing, knowing and accepting ourselves. If they don’t, please feel free get off the floor, roll up your mat and run out the door!

Try different teachers — we all have our own different influences, styles and personalities. Get to know your teachers. Find the one or two that you feel most comfortable with, whom you can trust as a leader.

Yoga teachers (while it’s appropriate to expect them to be kind, caring and compassionate) are not therapists, doctors or best friends. They can’t solve all of our personal problems, they can’t diagnose disease. It’s not fair to expect your yoga teacher to answer texts in the middle of the night or meet you for tea after every class.

Your Fellow Yogis

Know that you are not alone. Not everyone in the room can touch their toes or still their mind. Not everyone can rock those fancy party trick poses. You are among friends; you are allies, yoga warriors.

Your classmates will not judge you; they’re not here to watch or criticize your yoga practice. We’re here for ourselves. To touch our own toes, do our yoga party tricks. To feel better, to have a happy, healthy meaningful life.

When you walk into a new studio, take a look at the people around you. Introduce yourself, say hello — and don’t be surprised if someone reaches out and welcomes you. Are they people you know, are they neighbors, do they work nearby, do they have kids at the same school? Do they go to the same manicure place? It’s not necessary that you share all of this in common, but it does create a sense of camaraderie.

There are many different definitions and purposes of yoga. Some of us practice to learn about ourselves, to be in bliss, to discover the meaning of consciousness itself — or to get a yoga butt (and into those size four lulu pants!). Whether your journey is physical, philosophical or spiritual, once you’re practicing regularly (we always recommend at least 2-3 times a week), you’ll find like-minded folks, who share similar values and interests. You’ll find community, a sense of belonging and being together. That can be powerful, especially in our world where we tend to be so disconnected from each other — and ourselves.

So fear not, aspirational yogis. Be intimidated no more. Go for it. Get into it. You’ll be welcomed by others — and you’ll welcome yourself.

For more by Julie Buckner, click here.

For more on yoga, click here.

A Widow and a Widower Walk Into a Bar
When is a coincidence not a coincidence? If you believe in synchronicity, two or more events can be meaningfully related. Some believe meaningful coincidences happen in isolation. Others believe, like I do, that all events have meaning, and that the occasional dramatic example tends to become obvious to us only in the most startling coincidences. In other words, the obvious ones are just the tip of the iceberg.

For me, a startling coincidence might be walking into a crowded bar and meeting a woman around my age (35) that lost her husband to a devastating disease not long after I lost my wife; who has children around the same age as my daughter, and that shares many of my beliefs, including synchronicity. If I wrote about this encounter as fiction, a reader might be pressed to suspend their disbelief. Unlikely to be sure, but fact is stranger than fiction.

I usually shy away from talking to women at bars. Best case scenario, we get to know each other well enough for me to tell her how I recently quit my happy life to write a book for my daughter. Inevitably, the question arises, “Where’s the mother?” I disclose that she died. Responses are mixed, but my unexpected revelation startles them and silences all levity in our conversation. So when I recently met a stunning woman at a local bar, you can imagine how startled I was when she replied, “I lost my husband, too.”

The world around us went mute. I experienced a moment of synchronicity. The longer we spoke, the more meaningful the coincidence became. She said death is really a birth into a new existence. I told her how I planned the ceremony for my wife as a celebration of her rebirth, not a funeral. I told her that I’m moving to South America for six months. She’s embarking on her own six-month journey. We shared a knowing smile. We are traveling with matching emotional baggage.

Were we just two ships passing in the night? I found that cliché deeply unsatisfying. So I sent her a text the following day wanting to continue our conversation. We met again that night and spent the next two days raptured in dialogue. We couldn’t dismiss our encounter as mere cause and effect. For us, meaning was evident.

We are living the next six months more than 8,000 miles apart. If you believe that coincidences are just coincidences, you’d reason that our odds aren’t favorable. If you believe in synchronicity, you could choose from at least two interpretations. First, our encounter was a single moment in time meant to teach us that we are not alone. But a second, more provocative interpretation might be that our first encounter was just the tip of our iceberg.

For more by Ryon Harms, click here.

For more on love and relationships, click here.

How to Be Fearless in Relationships
I’m getting married in three weeks! This exciting time has taught me many spiritual lessons about relationships and I’m inspired to share them with you. Whether you’re manifesting romance, struggling with a family member, or hoping to deepen your relationships, these tools will help. Watch this video for guidance on how to release fear in relationships. Want to take these principles further? Check out my free Medidating lecture on fearless romance.

For more by Gabrielle Bernstein, click here.

For more on spiritual development, click here.

Good News – The Huffington Post
QUIZ: Can You Tell The Difference Between Modern Art And Paintings By Toddlers?
In 2005, ABCNews asked artists and an art historian to distinguish between modern art and art by 4-year-olds. They didn’t do too well. Let’s give it a try?

Green – The Huffington Post
Cantaloupe Listeria Outbreak Case: Little-Used Charges Employed Against Colorado Farmers
DENVER — It took two years for federal prosecutors to bring criminal charges against the owners of a southeastern Colorado cantaloupe farm linked to a 2011 listeria epidemic that killed 33 people.

And the charges are little-used misdemeanor counts of introducing adulterated food into interstate commerce. Only four other people have faced such charges in the past decade, according to an attorney who specializes in food-safety cases. Moments before brothers Eric and Ryan Jensen arrived in federal court in shackles Thursday to enter not-guilty pleas, a spokesman for federal prosecutors defended the slow-moving case.

Jeff Dorschner called the misdemeanor charges the “best, most serious charge we could find.”

Asked why the Jensens were charged when few food-poisoning cases end up in criminal court, Dorschner said prosecutors in this case were compelled to act because the outbreak was so serious and widespread.

“It was the magnitude of the number of people who were hospitalized and the number of people who died,” he said. Prosecutors said people in 28 states ate the cantaloupe, and 147 people were hospitalized.

Eric Jensen, 37, and Ryan Jensen, 33, wore khaki dress pants and collared dress shirts at their half-hour arraignment. They spoke little at the hearing but released a statement calling the outbreak a “terrible accident” and saying they were shocked and saddened by it.

The statement said the charges do not imply they knew about the contamination, or that they should have known about it.

The Jensens were released on unsecured bonds. Trial is scheduled for Dec. 2.

Only four other people have faced criminal charges in food poisoning cases in the U.S. in the past decade, said William Marler, who represents many of the listeria victims in civil cases against Jensen Farms.

Marler noted felony charges would have required prosecutors to show the contamination was intentional.

“The real significance of the case against the Jensens is they are being charged with misdemeanors, which do not require intent, just the fact that they shipped contaminated food using interstate commerce,” he said.

The FDA has said the outbreak probably was caused by pools of water on the floor and old, hard-to-clean packing equipment at the Jensens’ farm, which later filed for bankruptcy. The agency said investigators found positive listeria samples on equipment and fruit at the operation’s packing facility.

The six separate charges correspond with six dates when the cantaloupe was put into the food supply, all in July and August of 2011.

The outbreak delivered a serious blow to farms in Colorado’s revered Rocky Ford cantaloupe region, where hot, sunny days and cold nights produce fruit known for its distinct sweetness

Jensen Farms was about 90 miles away from Rocky Ford, but the Jensens used the Rocky Ford name, and sales dropped across the region. Later, Rocky Ford farmers registered Rocky Ford Cantaloupe as a trademark, hired a full-time food safety manager and built a central packing operation where melons are washed and rinsed.

Tammie Palmer, whose husband, Charles, became ill after eating the cantaloupe, said she hopes the Jensens never return to farming.

The Palmers, represented by Marler, filed a lawsuit against Jensen Farms seeking $2 million. The suit was still pending when Charles Palmer died this year of cancer.

“I was hoping everything would be settled and I could do something with my husband, but that’s not going to happen,” she said.

___

Associated Press writers Dan Elliott and Steven K. Paulson contributed to this report.

Celebrate National Estuaries Week and National Public Lands Day at a National Park Near You
As we celebrate National Estuaries Week and National Public Lands Day this week, I encourage all of you to join citizens as they gather and volunteer in coastal areas and public lands across the country. Our nation’s estuaries, bodies of water where freshwater meets the ocean, and public lands, especially America’s national parks, provide excellent recreational opportunities, critical habitat for plants and wildlife, and are economic generators that support local businesses and serve as tourist destinations for many. The National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA) is a long-time supporter of these volunteer events, which bring thousands of people together in the outdoors to plant trees, pick up litter, remove invasive plants, improve trails, and just have fun getting their hands dirty for a good cause. As a bonus, national parks are waiving entrance fees this Saturday to encourage visitors to experience the parks and volunteer.

As someone who lives and frequently sails on the Chesapeake Bay and works to protect and preserve America’s national parks, I have spent many years fighting for clean water, good policies, and strong funding for the waterways and national parks that are so important to me and my family, and millions of Americans across the country. When people visit our national parks and our Great Waters like the Chesapeake or the Great Lakes, they expect to see the best of what America has to offer, which is why it is so critical that we work together to ensure they are accessible to all.

These places represent the best of the great outdoors for all to enjoy, and they provide jobs and generate income for local communities. Collectively, our national parks represent a third of the top 25 domestic travel locations, generate more than $30 billion in economic activity, and provide more than a quarter million jobs annually. According to a report by Restore America’s Estuaries, coastal counties provide 40 percent of the nation’s jobs, including those in the commercial and recreational fishing industry that alone employs 1.5 million people.

NPCA has been working for many years to restore and protect these special places. Our America’s Great Waters program supports a larger national effort to protect, preserve, and restore our nation’s most iconic waterways, many of which are located near America’s national parks. From the Everglades, to Acadia and Olympic National Parks, there are nearly 80 national parks that are surrounded by estuaries that are critical to the restoration of healthy waterways, our way of life, and economic health. America’s Great Waters, which are known for their national significance and ongoing major restoration efforts, can be found coast-to-coast and include important estuaries like the Chesapeake Bay, New York – New Jersey Harbor and Hudson Estuary, the Everglades, Puget Sound, San Francisco Bay and more.

NPCA has made it a priority to better connect people to America’s national parks and estuaries and improve the ecological health of these incredible places. For example, NPCA’s Chesapeake Bay Freedom to Float campaign helps connect communities with the nearly 12,000 miles of shoreline that have little or no access in the Chesapeake watershed. By securing and protecting these shorelines, we make the land and water safer and cleaner for wildlife and migratory fish and more accessible to people. By creating public access locations, we have an opportunity to educate, inspire personal connections with nature, citizen stewardship, and landscape conservation.

Our successful advocacy efforts have also helped protect places like Drakes Estero, the ecological heart of the Point Reyes National Seashore, as the first marine wilderness area on the West Coast. The decision to remove a commercial oyster farm from the area and return the marine environment to its natural state was stipulated by Congress decades ago, but only finalized last year and ensures that this spectacular area is there for American’s to access and enjoy.

And in Florida, our efforts to restore freshwater flows to the Everglades has resulted in a $90 million commitment by Governor Rick Scott over the next three years to match National Park Service funds for additional bridging on Tamiami Trail, which has acted like a dam and blocked critical water flows to Everglades National Park and Florida Bay.

As we come together to celebrate and volunteer for National Estuaries Week and National Public Lands Day, I encourage you to get out and enjoy these treasured places and tell your members of Congress why they are special to you, necessary for a healthy economy, and encourage them to keep these places open and funded for all to experience and enjoy. Please visit, http://www.npca.org for more information about how to get involved at a national park near you.

Pharrell Wears Fur Coat Made Of All The Woodland Creatures
This is insane.

This outfit worn by producer and singer of the summer, Pharrell, looks like it took a whole forest’s worth of animals to make — assuming the fur is real, given that’s how Moncler outerwear is usually made. Pharrell donned the threads while attending Moncler’s Press Conference for their New Flagship Opening in Paris on Sept. 26th.

SO MUCH FUR.

181941414

Unreal. More like Furrell, amiright?

181941398

Poor woodland creatures…

Images from Getty.

Healthy Living – The Huffington Post
Cantaloupe Listeria Outbreak Case: Little-Used Charges Employed Against Colorado Farmers
DENVER — It took two years for federal prosecutors to bring criminal charges against the owners of a southeastern Colorado cantaloupe farm linked to a 2011 listeria epidemic that killed 33 people.

And the charges are little-used misdemeanor counts of introducing adulterated food into interstate commerce. Only four other people have faced such charges in the past decade, according to an attorney who specializes in food-safety cases. Moments before brothers Eric and Ryan Jensen arrived in federal court in shackles Thursday to enter not-guilty pleas, a spokesman for federal prosecutors defended the slow-moving case.

Jeff Dorschner called the misdemeanor charges the “best, most serious charge we could find.”

Asked why the Jensens were charged when few food-poisoning cases end up in criminal court, Dorschner said prosecutors in this case were compelled to act because the outbreak was so serious and widespread.

“It was the magnitude of the number of people who were hospitalized and the number of people who died,” he said. Prosecutors said people in 28 states ate the cantaloupe, and 147 people were hospitalized.

Eric Jensen, 37, and Ryan Jensen, 33, wore khaki dress pants and collared dress shirts at their half-hour arraignment. They spoke little at the hearing but released a statement calling the outbreak a “terrible accident” and saying they were shocked and saddened by it.

The statement said the charges do not imply they knew about the contamination, or that they should have known about it.

The Jensens were released on unsecured bonds. Trial is scheduled for Dec. 2.

Only four other people have faced criminal charges in food poisoning cases in the U.S. in the past decade, said William Marler, who represents many of the listeria victims in civil cases against Jensen Farms.

Marler noted felony charges would have required prosecutors to show the contamination was intentional.

“The real significance of the case against the Jensens is they are being charged with misdemeanors, which do not require intent, just the fact that they shipped contaminated food using interstate commerce,” he said.

The FDA has said the outbreak probably was caused by pools of water on the floor and old, hard-to-clean packing equipment at the Jensens’ farm, which later filed for bankruptcy. The agency said investigators found positive listeria samples on equipment and fruit at the operation’s packing facility.

The six separate charges correspond with six dates when the cantaloupe was put into the food supply, all in July and August of 2011.

The outbreak delivered a serious blow to farms in Colorado’s revered Rocky Ford cantaloupe region, where hot, sunny days and cold nights produce fruit known for its distinct sweetness

Jensen Farms was about 90 miles away from Rocky Ford, but the Jensens used the Rocky Ford name, and sales dropped across the region. Later, Rocky Ford farmers registered Rocky Ford Cantaloupe as a trademark, hired a full-time food safety manager and built a central packing operation where melons are washed and rinsed.

Tammie Palmer, whose husband, Charles, became ill after eating the cantaloupe, said she hopes the Jensens never return to farming.

The Palmers, represented by Marler, filed a lawsuit against Jensen Farms seeking $2 million. The suit was still pending when Charles Palmer died this year of cancer.

“I was hoping everything would be settled and I could do something with my husband, but that’s not going to happen,” she said.

___

Associated Press writers Dan Elliott and Steven K. Paulson contributed to this report.

Yoga and the Mind
The whole process of yoga is to transcend the limitations of the mind. As long as you are in the mind, you are ruled by the past, because mind is just an accumulation of the past. If you are looking at life only through the mind, then you will make your future just like the past, nothing more, nothing less. Isn’t the world enough proof of that? It does not matter what opportunities come our way through science, technology and many other things, aren’t we repeating the same historical scenes again and again?

If you take a closer look at your own life, you will see the same repetition happening because as long as you are functioning only through the prism of the mind, you are functioning only with old data. The past is carried only in your mind. Only because your mind is active, the past exists. Suppose your mind ceases right now, is your past here? There is no past here, only the present. The reality is only present, but past exists through our minds. Or in other words, mind is karma. If you transcend the mind, you transcend the karmic bondage altogether. If you want to solve them one by one, it may take a million years. In the process of solving, you are also building new stock of karma.

Your old stock of karma is not the problem at all. You should learn how not to create new stock. That is the main thing. Old stock will wear out by itself; no big things need to be done about it. But the fundamental thing is you learn how not to create new stock. Then, leaving the old stock is very simple.

If you transcend the mind, you transcend the karmic bondage also, completely. You don’t really have to work it out because when you are playing with your karmas, you are playing with the non-existent. It is a trap of the mind. The past does not exist, but you are dealing with the non-existent, going about as if it is a reality. That is the whole illusion. Mind is the basis of this. If you transcend the mind, you transcend everything in one stroke.

The whole effort of the spiritual sciences has always been how to transcend the mind, how to look at life beyond the limitations of the mind. Many people have defined yoga in many different ways. People say, “If you become one with the universe, it is yoga.” “If you go beyond yourself, it is yoga.” “If you are no longer subject to the laws of the physical, it is yoga.” All these things are fine and fantastic definitions, there is nothing wrong with them, but in terms of your experience, you cannot relate to them. Someone said, “If you become one with God, you are in yoga.” You don’t know where you are. You don’t know where God is. How to become one?

But Patanjali nailed it this way: “To rise above the modifications of your mind, when you cease your mind, when you cease to be a part of your mind, that is yoga.” All the influences of the world are entering you only through the instrument of the mind. If you can rise beyond the influence of your mind in full awareness, then you are naturally one with everything. The separation — you and me, time and space — has come only because of the mind. It is a bondage of the mind. If you transcend the mind, you have transcended time and space. There is no such thing as this and that. There is no such thing as here and there. There is no such thing as now and then. Everything is here and now.

If you rise above all the modifications and manifestations of the mind, then you can play with the mind whichever way you want. You can use your mind with devastating impact in your life, but if you are in it, you will never realize the nature of the mind.

This is an excerpt from “Mind Is Your Business,” available for purchase and download at Isha Downloads.

Sadhguru will hold Inner Engineering Programs in Tennessee (October 3-6) and San Mateo, California (October 11-13). For more information, click here.

Follow Sadhguru on Twitter: www.twitter.com/SadhguruJV

Breaking the Heart Open
Last night, I woke up at 3 a.m., and lately this has been happening with great frequency. I love the wee hours of the night. My heart feels different. It’s where the fog is lifted and I am in a state of clarity. All confusion melts away. This is the time (it is generally said around 4 a.m.), that the sages suggested to wake up and sit and meditate.

For me, this time isn’t just an experience of clarity. I’ve also experienced feeling lost and as if my heart is about to break. It is a very intense experience.

Usually when the heart feels pain and suffering we have a tendency go to our cell phones, computers, televisions. We will do practically anything but “sit with” or simply “be with” the pain. But for me, there has been no where and way to run. I needed to sit with the feelings and there were no thoughts to occupy my mind except the actual feelings that were arising. So I surrendered to what was there and prayed. I stayed with the feelings long enough that the pain turned and awakened my heart open and more clarity poured into my heart. It’s like I was awakened to the truth of my heart. This is now my favorite time of morning, and I know that I have no idea when being awakened like this is going to happen again. My yoga teacher refers to it as “Shakti awakening you in the middle of the night.”

I spend many days in meditation for this purpose: to quiet the mind enough so that I can have the deepest access to my heart’s language. We tend to make ourselves so busy doing everything we can possibly do to avoid a broken heart. But the breaking open is when the heart begins to speak to us most deeply. At that time of the night, there is something magical happening. A deep transmission.

Yogi Bhajan recommended waking up at Vatta time, from 3 a.m. — 5 a.m. (anytime before 6 a.m.). He recommended that you shower and rinse with cold water for a few seconds to wake up, then sit on your bed or in your sacred space, your meditation space (if you have one).

I find Snatam Kaur Ong Namo opens my heart and allows me to be softer to receive whatever may be there to receive. Sometimes, I even find that chanting with the music releases pain inside my heart. Then I do a few stretches and pranayama. I do three to 11 minutes of breath of fire, also called Kapalabati (you can see my instructions for this in my video on osiliving.com or osiyoga.com), and then I sit and I see what arises. Most importantly, I stay in and with the feelings, rather than in the thoughts.

If you feel pain and heaviness in the heart, know that the only way to the other side, is by going through it. Not by trying to control or manipulate what arises. But by feeling what comes up and staying with it.

I promise you that the more you practice this way, the more you will build trust in yourself and a relationship with the deepest language of your heart and relationship with your own soul.

“Your mind is your servant, your body is your vehicle and your soul is your residence.” — Yogi Bhajan

With Love,

Osi

To learn more about Osi Mizrahi, please visit her website, Facebook, and Twitter.

For more by Osi Mizrahi, click here.

For more on yoga, click here.

#alkalinity #alkalinitymovement #7.2 #sevenpointtwo

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