Need an Attitude Adjustment? Here’s How to Get One

GPS for the Soul – The Huffington Post
Need an Attitude Adjustment? Here’s How to Get One
One day you wake up feeling irritated by everyone, focused on “what’s wrong” in your life, or just plain apathetic to all of it. This cranky disposition just crept up on you. You may stay in this mood for awhile, but finally you say to yourself, “I hate feeling this way! This is not who I am. I need an attitude adjustment!”

Consider for a moment the possibility that you didn’t just fall into your bad mood based on a single event, but that you very gradually became immersed in a lack of happy thoughts due to an absorption of negative energy from the people around you. Perhaps a coworker made an unflattering remark to you the other day, and you’ve been trying to think of a comeback ever since. Maybe a friend called four times in the past week to vent about how her husband is a jerk and her kids don’t appreciate her and trying to be a good friend, you make her feel better by listening to every sordid detail and recalling examples in your own life when loved ones had been insensitive to you as well. The effects of these incidents may not be immediately noticeable, but each one builds upon the one before it, until they attach to you and take hold.

What this means from an energetic point of view is that little by little, your vibration has continually headed lower. It is so subtle sometimes that you don’t even realize it until it’s too late and has affected your attitude in a big way. Your thoughts increasingly grow overly negative from day to day, gaining momentum, until finally you’ve had enough! As far as you’re concerned, you are unloved and unappreciated, and no one is going to convince you any differently!

So what do we do when we realize we are the guest of honor at our own pity party? Here are three tried-and-true solutions to help you begin feeling like your cheery self again:

1) The Happiness Catalogue:

The Happiness Catalogue is where you write down all of the things you enjoy. For instance, you may list: playing your guitar (which you haven’t made time to do in years); taking a bubble bath, going out to the movies; taking your dog for a long walk while the sun shines brightly on your face; or how about baking cookies; putting together a puzzle on the kitchen table; or dancing around the house to your favorite tunes. Maybe you love flowers — go to the market and buy your special kind and just stare at them all day if you want. After all, this idea is akin to looking through a seed catalogue, full of a variety of beautiful, colorful options that are perfect just for you.

Personal happiness can only come from the experience of joy. No no one can do it for you; it has to come from feeling good on the inside. An imbalance in one’s life — caused by an abundance of negativity and a lack of fun and play — will eventually manifest into a bad attitude that will be a challenge to shake off. Put balance back into your life by doing things that make you smile.

2) Note to Self:

Try this experiment: Sit down and have your “future self” write a letter to your “current self.” Use your imagination and fantasize! The sky’s the limit! Tell your “current self” how amazing life is! The “future you” is having the time of his life! The “current you” doesn’t have to worry about a thing because that coworker who’s always rude to you took a job somewhere else — you now own your own extremely successful business — and your friend, who used to constantly complain to you, has never felt better and has nothing to say but positive things! You are able to live in the moment (which really isn’t so bad) without thinking about the past or the future, because everything totally works out. Your “future self” is loving life, and that is what you have to look forward to! All you need to do is be here now… the future will take care of itself and the past is old news.

3) E-motion Is Energy in Motion:

When energy moves through us, it takes the form of an emotion. When negative energy is trying to move through us, it takes the form of negative emotion. Therefore, if you’ve been exposed to lots of negative energy, your body and mind are going to try to release it as such. This is why an adjustment of your attitude may be in order. Crying is an action that comes out from inside and cleanses the emotions. Some people may see crying as a bad thing, making one even sadder. However, the truth is that we feel much better after a good cry! It actually elevates your vibration by making room for the joy to come in. So play some sad songs and just let it all out!

Take responsibility for your mood and choose not to stay in it. Realize that just as this energy moved into you, it must move out. Try not to be around others when in a bad mood so as not to spread the misery. Accept what it is, let it go, and allow yourself to move forward. The moment you start feeling a little depressed or begin having more and more negative thoughts, do not shrug it off and let it get worse. It’s a slippery slope. The longer you ignore these emotions, the harder it will be to detach from them and live a happy, emotionally healthy life. Nip it in the bud!

If your life is balanced, and you set aside time on a regular basis to have fun and do things that make you feel happy, then no matter what life and other people “throw” at you, it won’t affect you in such a negative way. Everything you encounter will be much, much easier to handle, because your vibration will naturally be higher, and you will not easily attach to the negative energy of others. However, if you wake up one day in a bad mood for “no apparent reason,” you’ll know that you have been neglecting that part of your life that brings you joy. So browse through your Happiness Catalog, make a “note to self,” and know that this too shall pass…

For more by Donna Labermeier, click here.

For more on emotional wellness, click here.

Take Two Breaths and Call Me in the Morning: An Unexpected Source of Relief From Arthritis Pain
It always comes as a surprise to my patients when I prescribe a painkiller for their arthritis joint pain that doesn’t require a written prescription and not even a trip to the pharmacy.

I tell them to breathe.

While it’s become fashionable to tell friends and colleagues “breathe!” — and there are equally fashionable desk and office accessories reminding the same — there’s some serious science behind the reason that breathing correctly can reduce pain.

Get out of the shallow end of the pool

If you’ve listened to any kind of meditation audio, you’ll know that being “mindful” of your breathing is a key component to moving into a meditative state. Most of us don’t think about our breathing, until we have a problem: Shortness of breath can signal a number of serious medical conditions, from a panic attack to a heart attack. Our breath is the very essence of aliveness.

Most of the time, we take short, shallow “rabbit” breaths into the upper part of the lungs. This kind of breathing activates the sympathetic stress receptors and is designed to help us function in an emergency. Originally, of course, it was an attack by the fabled saber-tooth tiger, but nowadays, it can be a virus alert on our computer, a cyclist who almost hits us as we step off a curb, a 2 a.m. phone call when a daughter hasn’t come home yet.

But another activator of the stress receptors is chronic pain in your knee, your toe, your hand, your back. Chronic pain might just be the modern day version of that saber-tooth monster our ancestors were always (supposedly) running away from.

When we take shallow breaths and activate those stress receptors, we are triggering an increase in heart rate, which constricts the blood vessels so that circulation become more efficient — and heightens our blood pressure. This is the classic “fight or flight” syndrome, an evolutionary survival mechanism designed to get us through a crisis, and it makes perfect sense when some crazed animal, phony hacker or distracted bicycle rider is threatening your life, or at least your peace of mind.

It doesn’t make sense when your pain level is ratcheted up. In fact, it just makes your life worse.

In “fight or flight,” the body releases stress-fighting hormones and produces harmful free radicals, hiking the levels of insulin and cholesterol. And because the human body is an amazing machine, a sense of dire emergency will even stop the burning of fat for fuel — conserving it for later, in case we’ve run so far away from whatever threat is facing us that we’ve run clear out of range of food.

(Of course, this is unlikely in a place like New York City, where most of my patients reside; every block and corner offers some kind of comestible — you’d have to run pretty far to get out of range of a restaurant, deli or hot pretzel stand.)

Fight or flight response is extremely helpful — life-saving — in a momentary crisis when quick, intensive action is needed. But if this behavior persists over a long period, it is ultimately destructive and life-shortening rather than life-preserving. And, if you suffer from chronic pain, you know too well what lengthy battle that can be.

Go deep

How you breathe can determine whether your body stores or burns fat. When you take shallow breaths, you don’t stand a chance of burning fat and losing weight. However, if you breathe deeply, you are activating the relaxation response (named by Dr. Herbert Benson). Not only will you feel more relaxed, but your body will also believe that it’s OK to start burning that fat again.

What does this have to do with reducing pain? Your goal in managing your arthritis pain is to keep it under control. If you focus on and regulate your breathing, it shifts the mind’s attention away from your pain and your body’s natural response to pain!

Proper breathing in a slow, controlled rhythm is the fastest pain reliever you can use. Your goal is to relax — the opposite of what the pain response is. It is normal to tense up when in pain. By activating the relaxation response you are, in fact, reducing your pain.

Here’s how to do some deep breathing for instant relief (these are demonstrated in my DVD, “Arthritis Rx,” and in the book of the same title):

Slow your breathing down as much as possible and take full, deep breaths. Try to inhale deeply through your nose and hold your breath in your lungs for a count of three.

Exhale fully by contracting your stomach slightly, then inhale until you feel your stomach expanding somewhat. Continue breathing this way for at least two to three minutes.

The pay-off

By deep breathing, you are delivering extra oxygen to your overstressed muscles, which allows them to relax. And you are also calming your mind and nervous system — which also will relieve your pain.

Using the deep breathing described here, you will also reduce the chronic back caused by arthritis or disk issues.

Never forget that your MIND is one of your most powerful allies in managing pain and restoring your body to full function. Practice deep breathing and unleash the potency of your mind in overcoming chronic pain.

For more by Dr. Vijay Vad, click here.

For more on personal health, click here.

What the World Needs Now Is More Beautiful Music
I believe that music is the highest of all the arts. It penetrates barriers and knows no boundaries. It does not discriminate. It calms shattered nerves, reducing stress. It helps us to heal at every level: physical, emotional and mental. It is the language of the soul.

Years ago as a single mom of three, I experienced firsthand the dramatic effect of music. As I stood at my kitchen sink in a highly agitated state, beautiful piano music filled the room. I literally felt the stress leave my body as the healing power of the music surrounded me. The music was coming from my tenant, who had permission to walk in my house and play the piano. He had no idea I was home.

The effect on me was immediate, whereas if I had taken a pill to calm down it would have taken time, not to mention the possibility of adverse side effects.

Music heals. It improves moods, creating a more positive state of mind that can help keep depression at bay. It stimulates brain cells, resulting in sharper concentration and more alert thinking.

Music can reduce your heart rate and blood pressure, thus lowering your risk of stroke and other related health problems. While negative emotions may trigger our pain response, music taps into the neurochemical pathways of healing, releasing endorphins that act as natural painkillers.

According to a study published in the Journal of Advanced Nursing, listening to music daily can reduce chronic pain by up to 21 percent. The study also revealed that listening to music allowed people to feel more in control of their pain, thus less disabled by their condition. (1)

Music evokes strong emotions and can alter how we perceive the world around us. It can stimulate certain areas of the brain, speed healing, decrease anxiety and increase optimism. Is there a drug on the market that can claim to do the same without potentially harmful side effects?

Why does music heal? Very little is known about why it has such healing properties. However, there is an ancient philosophical concept, commonly referred to as the harmony of the spheres. Pythagoras believed that the sun, moon and planets all emit their own unique hum based on their orbital revolution and that the quality of life on Earth reflects the tenor of celestial sounds that are physically imperceptible to the human ear.

For me, that is exactly why music is such a powerful force. It has the ability to touch us at a deep level, ever-reminding us that we are a part of a greater whole, which operates in perfect harmony. It reminds us that our natural state of being is harmonious and helps us realign when we’re stressed and in a state of discordance.

Below is an excerpt from an article called “Music in the Nursery” by Kate Mucci that elegantly describes the miraculous healing power of music.

A tiny infant lies in a neonatal ward. The heat of an incubator replaces the warmth of her mother’s arms; tubes filled with nutrients replace her mother’s milk. Every breath is a struggle. Her underdeveloped heart beats erratically. All around her are other infants in distress — the monitors attached to them bleep in time with their struggle to live. Fear is on the faces of anxious parents hovering as close as possible. Nurses scurry to and fro, dealing with crises every moment…

In the midst of this, a harpist enters the ward. She begins to softly play an ancient lullaby. After a few moments, the monitors steady. Nearly all of the infants breathe more easily; their heart rates steady, and they rest. Many of them fall into deep sleep — the first they have had since the harpist last was here. The nurses relax, and smiles of relief grace the faces of the parents when they see the tiny souls absorbing the healing power of this beautiful music.

Yes, what the world needs now is simply more and more beautiful music.

References:

1. Siedlecki, Sandra L. and Good, Marion. “Effect of music on power, pain, depression and disability.” Journal of Advanced Nursing Vol. 54.5. June, 2006: 553-562.

Journal of Advanced Nursing Press Release, 5/24/06

For more by Susan Ann Darley click here.

For more on happiness, click here.

Good News – The Huffington Post
Peter Buffett, Warren Buffett’s Son, Says Millennials Will Blaze New Trail In Philanthropy
When it comes to rethinking how charity works, philanthropist Peter Buffett believes millennials have a lot to give.

“Younger people have the appetite and idealism and energy for it like nobody else [to] imagine new structures,” he told policymic.com.

Buffett, a musician who’s perhaps best known as Warren Buffett’s son, says Gen-Yers might want to start with a cause that hits close to home.

“If I were 25 years old, I’d be first of all looking in my backyard,” he explained to policymic. “This is sort of a different version of ‘be the change you want to see in the world.’ If you really wanna do it, do it at home. Then do it at the community, the state level, and the national level. It’ll grow out if it works.”

While Buffett, 55, grew up as the offspring of one of the world’s richest men, he has forged his own identity in the nonprofit sector. According to the Financialist, he received $1 billion in Berkshire-Hathaway stock from his father in 2006 and used it to open the NoVo Foundation, an organization dedicated to empowering adolescent girls and ending violence against women of all ages.

Buffett, who runs the foundation with his wife, Jennifer, told the Financialist that he was inspired by a speech about the importance of educating girls at the first Clinton Global Initiative in 2005. (The 2013 edition concludes Thursday in New York City).

Now he wants to mobilize Gen-Yers to challenge what he sees as the status quo.

Buffett stirred debate with a recent New York Times essay in which he criticized what he called “conscience laundering,” a term to describe when the wealthy ease their guilt of having obscene amounts of money by “sprinkling a little around as an act of charity.”

“There should be real risks taken,” Buffett told policymic. “We should be out there spending some mad money to try things that no one else will try, with the expectation that some things will fail,” he said.

Joan Wind, 73-Year-Old Twerker, Will Make You Believe In Yourself Again (VIDEO)
Your life may have its ups and downs, but Joan Wind’s has more — homegirl can twerk it with the best of them.

The 73-year-old New York City woman was workin’ that booty Wednesday as she and 357 other twerkers earned the Guinness World Record for Most People Twerking Simultaneously. She was leaving Macy’s, holding several shopping bags, when she she saw the throng of cheeks flapping.

It was her time.

joan wind

She’s more of a hands-on-the-knees technique than an inverted-with-feet-on-the-wall kind of gal. In the video above, she proves that she has a lot better moves than many of her younger counterparts. She said twerking brought her back to the days of the Lindy.

“Two or three years ago I saw it but I didn’t think I could do it,” Wind told HuffPost Weird News. “Then I tried it at home in the mirror in the bedroom. And I said, ‘Oh, it’s shaking very good.'”

She said her favorite dance back in the day was the hustle. Now, with her new skills, Wind plans on starting a class for other seniors who want to know how how to get down. She was always the type of lady that would “chase after pigeons rather than feed them,” she says, and she wants to pass that attitude on to more of her peers.

Keep on twerkin, Joan.

Green – The Huffington Post
North Carolina Returns EPA Grant For Fracking Study
North Carolina’s environment agency has taken the unusual step of returning a federal grant to study streams and wetlands that could be harmed by hydraulic fracturing for natural gas.

Healthy Living – The Huffington Post
Take Two Breaths and Call Me in the Morning: An Unexpected Source of Relief From Arthritis Pain
It always comes as a surprise to my patients when I prescribe a painkiller for their arthritis joint pain that doesn’t require a written prescription and not even a trip to the pharmacy.

I tell them to breathe.

While it’s become fashionable to tell friends and colleagues “breathe!” — and there are equally fashionable desk and office accessories reminding the same — there’s some serious science behind the reason that breathing correctly can reduce pain.

Get out of the shallow end of the pool

If you’ve listened to any kind of meditation audio, you’ll know that being “mindful” of your breathing is a key component to moving into a meditative state. Most of us don’t think about our breathing, until we have a problem: Shortness of breath can signal a number of serious medical conditions, from a panic attack to a heart attack. Our breath is the very essence of aliveness.

Most of the time, we take short, shallow “rabbit” breaths into the upper part of the lungs. This kind of breathing activates the sympathetic stress receptors and is designed to help us function in an emergency. Originally, of course, it was an attack by the fabled saber-tooth tiger, but nowadays, it can be a virus alert on our computer, a cyclist who almost hits us as we step off a curb, a 2 a.m. phone call when a daughter hasn’t come home yet.

But another activator of the stress receptors is chronic pain in your knee, your toe, your hand, your back. Chronic pain might just be the modern day version of that saber-tooth monster our ancestors were always (supposedly) running away from.

When we take shallow breaths and activate those stress receptors, we are triggering an increase in heart rate, which constricts the blood vessels so that circulation become more efficient — and heightens our blood pressure. This is the classic “fight or flight” syndrome, an evolutionary survival mechanism designed to get us through a crisis, and it makes perfect sense when some crazed animal, phony hacker or distracted bicycle rider is threatening your life, or at least your peace of mind.

It doesn’t make sense when your pain level is ratcheted up. In fact, it just makes your life worse.

In “fight or flight,” the body releases stress-fighting hormones and produces harmful free radicals, hiking the levels of insulin and cholesterol. And because the human body is an amazing machine, a sense of dire emergency will even stop the burning of fat for fuel — conserving it for later, in case we’ve run so far away from whatever threat is facing us that we’ve run clear out of range of food.

(Of course, this is unlikely in a place like New York City, where most of my patients reside; every block and corner offers some kind of comestible — you’d have to run pretty far to get out of range of a restaurant, deli or hot pretzel stand.)

Fight or flight response is extremely helpful — life-saving — in a momentary crisis when quick, intensive action is needed. But if this behavior persists over a long period, it is ultimately destructive and life-shortening rather than life-preserving. And, if you suffer from chronic pain, you know too well what lengthy battle that can be.

Go deep

How you breathe can determine whether your body stores or burns fat. When you take shallow breaths, you don’t stand a chance of burning fat and losing weight. However, if you breathe deeply, you are activating the relaxation response (named by Dr. Herbert Benson). Not only will you feel more relaxed, but your body will also believe that it’s OK to start burning that fat again.

What does this have to do with reducing pain? Your goal in managing your arthritis pain is to keep it under control. If you focus on and regulate your breathing, it shifts the mind’s attention away from your pain and your body’s natural response to pain!

Proper breathing in a slow, controlled rhythm is the fastest pain reliever you can use. Your goal is to relax — the opposite of what the pain response is. It is normal to tense up when in pain. By activating the relaxation response you are, in fact, reducing your pain.

Here’s how to do some deep breathing for instant relief (these are demonstrated in my DVD, “Arthritis Rx,” and in the book of the same title):

Slow your breathing down as much as possible and take full, deep breaths. Try to inhale deeply through your nose and hold your breath in your lungs for a count of three.

Exhale fully by contracting your stomach slightly, then inhale until you feel your stomach expanding somewhat. Continue breathing this way for at least two to three minutes.

The pay-off

By deep breathing, you are delivering extra oxygen to your overstressed muscles, which allows them to relax. And you are also calming your mind and nervous system — which also will relieve your pain.

Using the deep breathing described here, you will also reduce the chronic back caused by arthritis or disk issues.

Never forget that your MIND is one of your most powerful allies in managing pain and restoring your body to full function. Practice deep breathing and unleash the potency of your mind in overcoming chronic pain.

For more by Dr. Vijay Vad, click here.

For more on personal health, click here.

#alkalinity #alkalinitymovement #7.2 #sevenpointtwo

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