Sometimes You Just Need to Get Lost

Sometimes You Just Need to Get Lost
These seven exercises will strengthen your mental flexibility, prepare you be more resilient to change and help you be more successful at work (because nimble thinking is often rewarded). And frankly, maybe you’ll have some fun doing things differently for a change.

Get Lost

No GPS allowed. Lose the compass. Try finding different ways to get home from work… even if it takes a little longer. Or try a new route for weekend chores. Once for a soccer carpool, the kids and I had a fun time finding 18 different ways to do our route. You never know what you might see when you turn off your autopilot. Or just take a turn down a different road and see where it goes. This is not recommended in Los Angeles, perhaps, or when you have to be somewhere on time, but you might enjoy some new scenery now and then.

Give It Up

Do without something you use on a regular basis for a week or a month or whatever feels interesting. Try living without something that is normally a staple in your life — like plastic or bread. In addition to practicing new ways to do things, you may find a way to rid yourself of a cumbersome habit or process.

Have an Opposite Day

Did you ever play opposite day as a kid? If you mean no, you say yes; you write with the opposite hand; wear your shirt inside out? Make a day where you try a few things in an “opposite” way, like brushing your teeth with the other hand or walking on a different side of the street. You’ll experience a different perspective and practice flexibility at the same time.

Take a Kid’s Approach

Kids’ wide-eyed approach to life is contagious. Most of them have not yet learned fear of failure and are not afraid to look silly. Be like them. Just go for it. Try a new dance move. Play a sport you aren’t good at. Take a class to learn a new skill. If you need help, go find a kid to encourage you. Get out of your comfort zone.

Have Some Wordplay

I dare you. Switch the language to an unfamiliar one at the ATM! It is good for an adult brain to be stretched to learn a new language, but if you aren’t in for that big of a challenge, just practice other languages here and there. When visiting an ethnic restaurant ask the hostess how to say “thank you” or “hello” in her language. (This is especially fun with kids.) On an airplane test yourself with the safety instructions. It is a harmless way to step out of your comfort zone and see the world from a different perspective.

Mix It Up

If your morning routine is predictable as instant oatmeal, then mix it up. It may be cozy in that routine, but this is just practice. You can go back to it tomorrow. Add a few extras that can even be treats (like five minutes for just listening to music, or speaking of oatmeal, a delicious bowl of organic oatmeal with fruit instead of your usual egg). Just make it different — walk the dog before breakfast instead of after breakfast. Your dog will be confused, but you’ll all be okay and you will have kicked your flexibility ability up a notch.

Hang Out With Strangers

If you only spend time with people just like you, you deny yourself a way to see life from different perspectives. Sure, those people like you are a comfortable bunch. But you know what I’m going to say about that! Stretch a little. Do something your friends think you would never do! Join a Sierra Club hike. Go to a book reading on something you know nothing about. Take in a Poetry Slam. Participate in SantaCon.

Stretch yourself!

For more by Jennifer Maffett, click here.

For more on happiness, click here.

Are You Living Your Eulogy or Your Résumé?
“Today I want every American to see how these men and women lived,” President Obama said Sunday, eulogizing the 12 men and women killed in the Washington Navy Yard shooting. He spoke of volunteers who made time to give back to their communities, like “Frank Kohler, giving dictionaries to every third-grader in his county,” and “Marty Bodrog, leading the children’s Bible study at church.” There were fathers like Mike Ridgell, “coaching his daughters’ softball teams and joining Facebook just to keep up with his girls, one of whom said he was always the cool dad.” There were mothers like Mary Francis Knight, “devoted to her daughters … who had just recently watched with joy as her older daughter got married,” and grandparents like John Johnson, “always smiling, giving bear hugs to his 10 grandchildren … who would have welcomed his 11th grandchild this fall.”

Have you noticed that when people die, their eulogies celebrate life very differently from the way we define success in our everyday existence? Eulogies are, in fact, very Third Metric. At HuffPost we’ve made the Third Metric — redefining success beyond money and power to include well-being, wisdom and our ability to wonder and to give — a key editorial focus. But while it’s not hard to live a Third Metric life, it’s very easy not to. It’s easy to let ourselves get consumed by our work. It’s easy to use work to let ourselves forget the things and the people that truly sustain us. It’s easy to let technology wrap us in a perpetually harried, stressed-out existence. It’s easy, in effect, to miss our lives even while we’re living them. Until we’re no longer living them.

For most of us, our eulogy will be not just the first formal marking down of what our lives were about but the only one. The eulogy is the foundational document of our legacy, of how people remember us, of how we live on in the minds and hearts of others. And it is very telling what you don’t hear in eulogies. You almost never hear things like:

“Of course his crowning achievement was when he made senior vice president.”

Or:

“What everybody loved most about her was how she ate lunch at her desk. Every day.”

Or:

“He was proud that he never made it to one of his kid’s Little League games because he always wanted to go over those figures one more time.”

Or:

“She didn’t have any real friends, but she had 600 Facebook friends, and she dealt with every email in her inbox every night.”

Or:

“But he will live on, not in our hearts or memories, because we barely knew him, but in his PowerPoint slides, which were always meticulously prepared.”

No matter how much a person spends his or her life burning the candle at both ends, chasing a toxic definition of success and generally missing out on life, the eulogy is always about the other stuff: what they gave, how they connected, how much they meant to the lives of the real people around them, small kindnesses, lifelong passions and what made them laugh.

So the question is: Why do we spend so much time on what our eulogy is not going to be?

“Eulogies aren’t résumés,” David Brooks wrote in June. “They describe the person’s care, wisdom, truthfulness and courage. They describe the million little moral judgments that emanate from that inner region.”

And yet we spend so much time and effort and energy on those résumé entries, which are gone as soon our heart stops beating. Even for those who die with amazing résumés, whose lives were synonymous with accomplishment and achievement, their eulogies are mostly about what they did when they weren’t achieving and succeeding — at least by our current, broken definition of success. For example, look at Steve Jobs, a man whose life, at least as the public saw it, was about creating things, things that were, yes, amazing and game-changing, but when his sister, Mona Simpson, rose to memorialize him at his memorial service at Stanford University, that’s not what she focused on.

Yes, she talked about his work and his work ethic, but mostly as manifestations of his passions. “Steve worked at what he loved,” she said. But what really moved him, what he really loved, was love. “Love was his supreme virtue,” she said, “his god of gods.” And though yes, he loved his work, he loved his family too:

When [his son] Reed was born, he began gushing and never stopped. He was a physical dad, with each of his children. He fretted over Lisa’s boyfriends and Erin’s travel and skirt lengths and Eve’s safety around the horses she adored.

And then she added this touching image: “None of us who attended Reed’s graduation party will ever forget the scene of Reed and Steve slow dancing.”

And about his wife: “His abiding love for Laurene sustained him. He believed that love happened all the time, everywhere. In that most important way, Steve was never ironic, never cynical, never pessimistic.”

And then there were lines like these, sprinkled throughout:

“Steve was humble.”

“Steve liked to keep learning.”

“Steve cultivated whimsy.”

“With his four children, with his wife, with all of us, Steve had a lot of fun.”

“He treasured happiness.”

“He was an intensely emotional man.”

His sister made sure in her eulogy that we knew that Steve Jobs was a lot more than just the guy who invented the iPhone. He was a brother and a husband and a father who knew the true value of what technology can so easily distract us from. Even if you build an iconic product, even one that lives on, what will be foremost in the minds of the people you care about most will be the memories you built in their lives. In her 1951 novel Memoirs of Hadrian, Marguerite Yourcenar has the Roman emperor meditating on his death: “[I]t seems to me as I write this hardly important to have been emperor.”

And Thomas Jefferson’s epitaph describes him as “author of the Declaration of American Independence … and father of the University of Virginia.” No mention of the presidency.

What the old adage that we should live every day as our last usually means is that we shouldn’t wait until it’s our last day on Earth to begin prioritizing the things that really matter.

Anyone with a few smartphones and a full email inbox knows that it’s easy to live while not being aware we’re living. So a Third Metric life would be one lived in a way that’s mindful of what our eulogy will one day be. “I’m always relieved when someone is delivering a eulogy and I realize I’m listening to it,” joked George Carlin. We may not be listening to our own eulogy, but we’re actually writing it all the time, every day. The question is how much we’re giving the eulogizer to work with.

This past summer an obituary of a Seattle woman named Jane Lotter, who died of cancer at 60, went viral. The author of the obit was Lotter herself.

“One of the few advantages of dying from Grade 3, Stage IIIC endometrial cancer, recurrent and metastasized to the liver and abdomen,” she wrote, “is that you have time to write your own obituary.” After giving a lovely and lively account of her life, she shows that she lived a life with the true definition of success in mind. “My beloved Bob, Tessa, and Riley,” she writes. “My beloved friends and family. How precious you all have been to me. Knowing and loving each one of you was the success story of my life.”

Just months before the historian Tony Judt died of ALS in 2010, he gave an amazing interview to Terry Gross on NPR’s Fresh Air. She asked him about his spiritual beliefs. He replied:

I don’t believe in an afterlife. I don’t believe in a single or multiple godhead. I respect people who do, but I don’t believe it myself. But there’s a big “but” which enters in here: I am much more conscious than I ever was, for obvious reasons, of what it will mean to people left behind once I’m dead. It won’t mean anything for me, but it will mean a lot to them, and it’s important for them, by which I mean my children or my wife or my close friends, that some spirit of me is, in a positive way, present in their lives, in their heads, in their imaginings and so on. So in one curious way I’ve come to believe in the afterlife as a place where I still have moral responsibilities, just as I do in this life except that I can only exercise them before I get there. Once I get there, it’ll be too late. So no god, no organized religion, but a developing sense that there’s something bigger than the world we live in, including after we die, and that we have responsibilities in that world.

So whether you believe in an afterlife, as I do, or not, by being fully present in your life and in the lives of those you love, you are creating your own afterlife and writing your own eulogy. It’s a valuable lesson, even more so while we have the good fortune of being healthy and having the energy and freedom and lack of impediments to create a life of purpose and meaning.

It shouldn’t take a near-death experience to remind us of what we’re all going to lose one day. According to Colors magazine, something called “living funeral therapy” is becoming increasingly popular in South Korea, which has the highest suicide rate of developed countries. It can involve actually getting in a coffin and having it nailed shut, to experience a glimpse of the finality and closure of death. One operator sometimes has the participants make a list of the people in their lives who matter to them. One woman said the process made her realize she’d been neglecting her husband. “I feel like I’ve been reborn,” she said. “I want to call my husband, to tell him ‘thank you,’ and ‘sorry.'”

It’s an extreme method, and hopefully most of us won’t need to be nailed shut inside a coffin to get a sense of what we really value. But the good news is that if you’re reading this, there’s still time to live up to the best version of your eulogy.

Here are some of my favorite eulogies, courtesy of Alison Nastasi of The Atlantic. Do you have a favorite eulogy, or something in particular you remember from a eulogy you heard? Please use the comments section to share.

When You Don’t Know What to Say
“The friend that holds your hand and says the wrong thing is made of dearer stuff than the one who stays away.” — Barbara Kingsolver

This quote has always spoken to me, and I was reminded of it recently when a friend going through a rough time said I, “always know the right thing to say.”

I laughed to myself, as that sounded ridiculous to me. While I might be good at offering a perspective I fail to absorb in my own daily life — denial is truly a gift, my friends — most of the time I just ramble and hope that something might stick, that I might be able to help ease just a smidgen of pain.

My problem is that I’m a “fixer.”

Unfortunately, there seems to be a string of pretty crappy things happening lately that proves we all have “something” that we’re dealing with that’s out of our control.

There’s no greater feeling of helplessness than to know that someone you care about is sick, financially strapped, in pain (physically or emotionally) or, let’s be honest, dealing with death — the reality of their own or that of a parent, a friend or the horror of the loss of a child.

There are no “right” words, and at some point you realize that things happen to you and happen around you that can’t be fixed.

And it’s not your job to fix them.

I think a lot of people unintentionally ignore these things at times, not because they don’t care, but simply because they can’t “fix” them and have no clue how to react. Those who are sick or aging aren’t necessarily the same people we’ve known them to be, and selfishly, we want them to be the people they were before they got sick, before they got old, before they became so… mortal.

The realization that things will never be the same — and that you can’t fix it as such — is enough to make you stress yourself out in an attempt to save the world or conversely stay at home curled up in a ball, not dealing with it at all.

But just as much as you don’t want to deal with it, I can guarantee that the person who is sick or struggling doesn’t want to deal with it a million times more — but they do, often with courage and grace.

I think that in and of itself can be intimidating, the fact that you are lucky enough to be in a comparatively better position. The strength of those who aren’t can be inspiring beyond belief, but it can also make us question how we would be if faced with such a challenge.

It takes courage to face the unknown, but it’s much easier to do so when you’re on the right side of the coin, to be the one who has a choice.

But the fact is that as strong as they are or appear to be, they’re probably still scared. So we put the guilt aside for wanting them to be the people they were before they got sick, before they got old, before they became so… mortal. Because at their core, they are the same people.

And you know what?

They know that you can’t fix things, and most don’t expect you to. They have no choice but to deal the hand they were dealt, and sometimes they just want you to hold that hand.

They don’t want to do it alone.

That’s one thing I — and you — can fix.

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For more by Abby Heugel, click here.

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