Oprah Tells Brené Brown About The Moment She Learned To Be Herself On TV (VIDEO)

GPS for the Soul – The Huffington Post
Oprah Tells Brené Brown About The Moment She Learned To Be Herself On TV (VIDEO)
Oprah loved her first job in television, but she says she had a lot to learn in the early years of her career. Though she made mistakes, she tells shame and vulnerability researcher Brené Brown that they allowed her to become her authentic self.

“When I was first starting out in television I was pretending to be like Barbara Walters, because that was the role model,” Oprah says in the above clip from “Oprah’s Lifeclass.”

“I was just trying to sit like Barbara, talk like Barbara, act like Barbara,” she says.

But to try to appear spontaneous, Oprah decided not to read the TV copy ahead of time so it would sound fresh. While reading the news on-air one night, Oprah made the mistake of pronouncing Canada as “Can-ahh-da.”

“Literally, hello ‘Can-ahh-da,” Oprah says.

Rather than feel embarrassed about the mistake, Oprah explains how it allowed her to be more authentic. “I cracked myself up, and that was my breaking through the wall, to start to be myself — because Barbara Walters would never call Canada, ‘Can-ahh-da,'” Oprah says.

The positive way people responded to her, flaws and all, “allowed me to be a real person, really opened the door for me,” Oprah says.

“I think the vulnerable thing has always been — that’s the space where I live,” Oprah says. “You tell the story, you offer it to people, they accept it, they don’t, that’s OK.”

Oprah and Brown delve into the power of vulnerability on “Oprah’s Lifeclass” this Sunday, September 22 at 9 p.m. ET on OWN.

Good News – The Huffington Post
Michael Vick Appearance Canceled: MMA Fighter Gordon Shell Will Call Off More Protests If NFL Player Competes In Cage Match (UPDATED)
Michael Vick will not be appearing at a Buffalo Wild Wings restaurant in York, Pa. He’d been scheduled to sign autographs there, for $75 each — photos would be another $75 — on Oct. 31.

But earlier this week, word got out in the animal advocacy community about the NFL player and convicted dogfighter‘s event, which led to a lot of angry messages directed at Buffalo Wild Wings. (Here’s a sample post on Facebook: “You suck. Your food sucks. Anyone who eats there sucks. And whoever thought liking/ supporting Michale Vick should burn in hell.”)

Friday, the restaurant confirmed that Vick was out.

“The event was arranged through a third party and did not follow the proper process or go through appropriate approvals,” David Hakensen, a Buffalo Wild Wings spokesperson, said in an email to HuffPost. Hakensen declined to say if the protests influenced the decision, saying that “I believe the statement speaks for itself.”

And Gordon Shell, a mostly-retired mixed martial arts fighter from Detroit who now spends his time raising money for and otherwise championing dogs (and selling anti-microbial countertops), couldn’t be happier.

Or he could, but only if Michael Vick would finally agree to meet him in a cage.

Shell, who just turned 44, quit MMA last year with more than 20 years of competing under his belt, after being diagnosed with a serious heart condition. Plus, he says, “I just didn’t like getting punched in the face anymore.”

He’s willing to get punched one more time, though, if Vick says yes to what Shell hopes will be a match shown on Pay Per View, that would raise money for animal rescue groups and would also satisfy those who believe the now-Philadelphia Eagles quarterback’s jail sentence and fines haven’t been punishment enough.

“If you truly want redemption, if you truly want to be free, people want to see you bleed,” says Shell. “At the end of the fight, I’m going to grab the microphone, and just announce to all the animal advocates, OK, this man has actually stepped up. We’re both bleeding. He’s bleeding. He’s felt like what it’s like to be a dog. Except he’s still alive, we haven’t electrocuted him. But he’s stepped up. Now we have to let him finally be free.”

Shell says he understands that this fight is unlikely to happen, while Vick is still employed as a football player (Vick’s publicist said a year ago he wanted “no part of it,” Shell told one blogger; we’ve reached out to Vick and haven’t yet heard back). But this is not the first time that activists have shut down a Vick appearance. And Shell’s hoping that the protests will make enough of an impact on Vick’s image and his earnings that once his career is is over as a professional athlete, they’ll step in the ring.

“We’re America. We don’t do an eye for an eye,” says Shell. “But we can put him in a cage, regulated. And put on a nice show. We can generate so much money that can help out the abused animals.”

Meantime, among his other activities, Shell’s selling t-shirts that say “Fight Me Mike Vick”:

@Bigdog327 "Fight Me, Mike Vick" pic.twitter.com/lY8DNL0j

— Jaime Daughtridge (@banksruption) December 10, 2012

And while Buffalo Wild Wings is now being barraged with thank you notes for canceling the Vick appearance, the Minnesota-based chain hasn’t seen the end of its protestors: Second Amendment enthusiasts still have unhappy words, and Facebook pages, about the restaurant’s preference toward customers not carrying guns.

Update, Sept. 21, 10:01 a.m.: WHP CBS 21 reports that the promoter of the event that was to have been held at the Buffalo Wild Wings, JJ Cards N Toys, may reschedule the signing another venue — despite the family that owns JJ Cards receiving death threats for associating with Vick.

“The message was, ‘I wish your wife and kids would die,'” JJ Cards’ co-owner Jamie Bartolo told the station.

Some 70 people had already purchased tickets, Bartola said, telling CBS 21 that she considers the threats to be a type of “cyber bullying” and would decide next week whether to change venues for the Vick event or call the event off entirely.

Healthy Living – The Huffington Post
Ted Cruz, Mike Lee Unnerve Some Of Their Republican Colleagues
WASHINGTON — Ted Cruz and Mike Lee stand as the Senate’s dynamic duo for conservatives, crusading against President Barack Obama’s health care law while infuriating many congressional Republicans with a tactic they consider futile, self-serving and detrimental to the party’s political hopes in 2014.

Cruz, the Texan who’s been anything but a wait-your-turn freshman, and Lee, the tea party-backed giant slayer from Utah’s 2010 election, spent months this summer pressuring Republicans to link any stopgap spending bill to keep the government running with permanently starving President Barack Obama’s health overhaul of money. The two former Supreme Court clerks are determined to reverse what the conservative court of Chief Justice John Roberts upheld in 2012 – Obama’s signature domestic law.

The senators scored a win Friday when the Republican-led House, pushed by rambunctious rank-and-file members, passed a spending measure that would unravel the law. But the approach faces near-certain defeat in the Democratic-controlled Senate, where lawmakers in both parties complain that Cruz and Lee have pushed a losing cause.

In the meantime, their strategy has roiled many in the GOP, with plenty of public and private carping. House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, subtly challenged Cruz and Lee to back up their words next week.

“I expect my Senate colleagues to be up for the battle,” Boehner said.

Several Republicans complain that the tactic could lead to a government shutdown on Oct. 1, the start of the new budget year, that would undercut the GOP politically as the party faces a Democratic president weakened by missteps on Syria.

They question Cruz and Lee’s uncompromising approach, which has raised money for outside conservative groups and provided them with more than 1 million signatures on a “Defund It” petition; those are names that could be mined for future fundraising. Cruz’s recent political moves have stirred talk of a 2016 presidential run.

Some Republicans privately fume that Cruz and Lee, stars of “Defund Obamacare” ads from the Senate Conservatives Fund, come off as the only two Republicans opposed to the health care law when in fact Republicans were united for months against Obama and the Democrats in trying to head off the law in 2009 and still vehemently oppose it.

Looking ahead to next year’s elections, Republican Sen. Bob Corker said he held a fundraiser at his Tennessee home for the state’s senior senator, Lamar Alexander, a steady conservative who is seeking a third term.

“Now he’s (Alexander) using that money to defend himself against ads that Republicans are helping create,” said Corker said, questioning whether the defund ads were “a thoughtful way of going about changing policy.”

Alexander has countered any misperceptions with a commercial spot that highlights his 23 votes against the health care law, describes him as leading the “conservative fight against Obamacare” and shows his winter 2010 exchange with Obama over premium costs at a White House forum with lawmakers.

The internecine fight, brutally on display in GOP primaries in Kentucky, South Carolina and Tennessee, could undermine the GOP’s legitimate shot at winning a Senate majority next year. Twenty-one Democratic seats are on state ballots next year compared with 14 Republican, and the GOP will need to gain six seats to win control of the 100-member chamber.

“I hate Obamacare,” said Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah. “I think it’s one of the worst things that’s been peddled off on America. I don’t blame anybody for doing what they can to try to kill it, but there should be an end game.”

Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., called the combination of defunding “Obamacare” and the spending bill a “political ploy.”

Still, Cruz and Lee press ahead, with a showdown in the Senate this coming week. Conservatives and tea partyers are ecstatic.

JoAnn Fleming, an activist in the Kingwood Tea Party in East Texas, praised Cruz for his singular quest. She commended him for cutting through the noise, which she defined as “those people in the Republican Party who always have an excuse for not doing the right thing.”

“They think a freshman is just supposed to come to Washington and sit down and shut up, and Ted Cruz is not at all like that,” said Fleming, who also heads the citizen’s advisory committee to the Tea Party Caucus in the Texas Legislature. “We didn’t elect him to go to Washington to just sit down and fall in line with the rest of them. And so he’s done exactly what we sent him to Washington to do.”

Fleming said people lined up three hours to four hours in advance for one of Cruz’ “defund” tour stops this summer in Texas. An activist for 21 years, Fleming said she never saw anything like it.

The 42-year-old Cruz stunned the Republican establishment in 2012, capturing the GOP nomination from Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst, who had the money and the backing of Gov. Rick Perry.

Cruz, a Cuban-American with an Ivy League resume, time as Texas solicitor general and a Supreme Court clerkship with the late Chief Justice William Rehnquist, created headlines in his first few months in the Senate with a fierce challenge to Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel’s nomination.

Cruz promised this past week to do “everything and anything possible to defund Obamacare,” including a possible filibuster, describing the law as a job killer.

Lee said that although the conventional wisdom is Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., has the votes to stop their effort, “in the meantime, those of us who feel strongly that Obamacare needs to be defunded will continue with our message.”

In several fundraising appeals, Lee has warned that Obama, Democrats, the media and “even some from own party” are lying about his efforts to defund “Obamacare,” saying he’s trying to shut down the government. Not so, says Lee, who argues that he’s trying to keep the government operating and end the health care law.

“The point is Obamacare ought to be able to stand on its own merits,” Lee said. “The law is increasingly unpopular with the American people, causing increasing amount of uncertainty among Americans. Most Americans currently believe that Obamacare’s impact will make their family health care situation worse, not better.”

The health care law and the tea party’s furious response helped propel Lee to Washington in 2010. The 42-year-old Lee, the son of President Ronald Reagan’s solicitor general, Rex Lee, and a former clerk for Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito, snatched the Senate seat from Republican Sen. Robert Bennett.

He challenged Bennett over the incumbent’s backing for the 2008 financial bailout. Lee has remained steadfast in sticking to his conservative approach without compromise.

“I will not vote for spending legislation that votes for Obamacare,” Lee said.

Cruz and Lee continue to appear in the Senate Conservatives Fund ads, and the organization reported raising $1.8 million so far this year, according to the Federal Election Commission. The ads are running nationwide – in Republican and Democratic leaning states.

____

Follow Donna Cassata on Twitter: http://twitter.com/DonnaCassataAP

Green – The Huffington Post
Michael Vick Appearance Canceled: MMA Fighter Gordon Shell Will Call Off More Protests If NFL Player Competes In Cage Match (UPDATED)
Michael Vick will not be appearing at a Buffalo Wild Wings restaurant in York, Pa. He’d been scheduled to sign autographs there, for $75 each — photos would be another $75 — on Oct. 31.

But earlier this week, word got out in the animal advocacy community about the NFL player and convicted dogfighter‘s event, which led to a lot of angry messages directed at Buffalo Wild Wings. (Here’s a sample post on Facebook: “You suck. Your food sucks. Anyone who eats there sucks. And whoever thought liking/ supporting Michale Vick should burn in hell.”)

Friday, the restaurant confirmed that Vick was out.

“The event was arranged through a third party and did not follow the proper process or go through appropriate approvals,” David Hakensen, a Buffalo Wild Wings spokesperson, said in an email to HuffPost. Hakensen declined to say if the protests influenced the decision, saying that “I believe the statement speaks for itself.”

And Gordon Shell, a mostly-retired mixed martial arts fighter from Detroit who now spends his time raising money for and otherwise championing dogs (and selling anti-microbial countertops), couldn’t be happier.

Or he could, but only if Michael Vick would finally agree to meet him in a cage.

Shell, who just turned 44, quit MMA last year with more than 20 years of competing under his belt, after being diagnosed with a serious heart condition. Plus, he says, “I just didn’t like getting punched in the face anymore.”

He’s willing to get punched one more time, though, if Vick says yes to what Shell hopes will be a match shown on Pay Per View, that would raise money for animal rescue groups and would also satisfy those who believe the now-Philadelphia Eagles quarterback’s jail sentence and fines haven’t been punishment enough.

“If you truly want redemption, if you truly want to be free, people want to see you bleed,” says Shell. “At the end of the fight, I’m going to grab the microphone, and just announce to all the animal advocates, OK, this man has actually stepped up. We’re both bleeding. He’s bleeding. He’s felt like what it’s like to be a dog. Except he’s still alive, we haven’t electrocuted him. But he’s stepped up. Now we have to let him finally be free.”

Shell says he understands that this fight is unlikely to happen, while Vick is still employed as a football player (Vick’s publicist said a year ago he wanted “no part of it,” Shell told one blogger; we’ve reached out to Vick and haven’t yet heard back). But this is not the first time that activists have shut down a Vick appearance. And Shell’s hoping that the protests will make enough of an impact on Vick’s image and his earnings that once his career is is over as a professional athlete, they’ll step in the ring.

“We’re America. We don’t do an eye for an eye,” says Shell. “But we can put him in a cage, regulated. And put on a nice show. We can generate so much money that can help out the abused animals.”

Meantime, among his other activities, Shell’s selling t-shirts that say “Fight Me Mike Vick”:

@Bigdog327 "Fight Me, Mike Vick" pic.twitter.com/lY8DNL0j

— Jaime Daughtridge (@banksruption) December 10, 2012

And while Buffalo Wild Wings is now being barraged with thank you notes for canceling the Vick appearance, the Minnesota-based chain hasn’t seen the end of its protestors: Second Amendment enthusiasts still have unhappy words, and Facebook pages, about the restaurant’s preference toward customers not carrying guns.

Update, Sept. 21, 10:01 a.m.: WHP CBS 21 reports that the promoter of the event that was to have been held at the Buffalo Wild Wings, JJ Cards N Toys, may reschedule the signing another venue — despite the family that owns JJ Cards receiving death threats for associating with Vick.

“The message was, ‘I wish your wife and kids would die,'” JJ Cards’ co-owner Jamie Bartolo told the station.

Some 70 people had already purchased tickets, Bartola said, telling CBS 21 that she considers the threats to be a type of “cyber bullying” and would decide next week whether to change venues for the Vick event or call the event off entirely.

#alkalinity #alkalinitymovement #7.2 #sevenpointtwo

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s