Here Are 50 Marijuana Users Who Are Unbelievably Successful

Green – The Huffington Post
Here Are 50 Marijuana Users Who Are Unbelievably Successful
These guys just blew pothead stereotypes up in smoke.

Though marijuana opponents have long pointed to studies suggesting that long-term use could be tied to a lack of motivation, a sampling of successful users suggests otherwise.

Pot policy reform group Marijuana Policy Project has released a list of the top 50 most influential Americans who have used marijuana, and it’s a doozy.

The list contains politicians, Supreme Court justices, entertainers, entrepreneurs and a certain leader of the free world had a habit of “intercepting” joints as a teen in Hawaii. Some admitted only to trying the drug once or twice, while others, like Maya Angelou, reportedly “smoked marijuana with abandon.”

“The goal here is to dispel the myth that marijuana users are ‘losers’ who lack motivation, and highlight the fact that they are typically productive and oftentimes quite successful,” said Mason Tvert, director of communications for the Marijuana Policy Project, in a release. “As this list demonstrates, many of our nation’s most successful citizens have used marijuana.”

Check out the slideshow below for MPP’s full list of of the top most 50 influential Americans who have used marijuana:

After Seeing This Graph, You’ll Never Look At Your Refrigerator The Same Way Again
Todd Moss, vice president and senior fellow at the Center for Global Development, recently bought a new refrigerator. It’s one of the nice new refrigerators. The super-energy efficient refrigerators. The ones that come with a little yellow tag bragging about how little energy they use each year. But Moss, who’s got a more global view than most, knows “energy efficient” means very different things on different continents.

Overpopulation Is Not the Problem? Really?
Last week, the New York Times published an opinion piece titled, “Overpopulation is Not the Problem.” Written by Erle C. Ellis, an associate professor of geography and environmental systems at the University of Maryland, the column dismisses as “nonsense” concerns that, “… by transforming the earth’s natural landscapes, we are undermining the very life support systems that sustain us.”

Wow. That’s a relief. When scientists around the world are warning that humanity is in danger of exceeding “planetary boundaries” and causing irreparable harm to the environment and its ability to sustain existing life forms, including human life, it is refreshing — in the extreme — to hear that we have nothing to worry about.

While acknowledging that we live on a finite planet with finite resources, Ellis insists that there “is no such thing as a human carrying capacity.” Other species on this planet suffer massive die-offs when their numbers exceed what nature can sustainably provide, but modern humans, according to Ellis, are an exception to that rule. Humans, in his words, do not have to “live within the natural environmental limits of our planet.”

In support of that bold proposition, he notes that at numerous times in the past 200,000 years humans have altered the natural environment so as to increase the carrying capacity for our species. When we hunted large animals to near extinction, we found ways to hunt and consume smaller species. When our hunter-gather lifestyles did not produce enough food, we domesticated animals and began growing crops. When traditional farming was not producing enough, we manufactured fertilizer and began irrigating our crops. And because we expanded our carrying capacity in the past, we can do so again in the future.

However, as anyone on Wall Street will tell you, past performance does not guarantee future results. The fact that a value of a stock has doubled or tripled in the past does mean that it can go on doubling or tripling on into the future. In nature, as in the financial world, there are limits to exponential growth on a finite planet. Sooner or later, what goes up ultimately comes down. And many times it comes down with a crash or a bang. Bubbles burst.

So is there any danger that the human ‘bubble’ will burst? Ellis says, in effect, don’t worry. “There is no environmental reason for people to go hungry now or in the future.”

In Ellis’s worldview, we are gods who can shape the world to fit us, no matter how great the size of our population. He says, “The only limits to creating a planet that future generations will be proud of are our imaginations… ” Such a view, of course, is not just silly, it is dangerous folly. The ancient Greeks had a term for it: hubris.

The idea that our “imagination” gives us license to stop worrying about pumping too much carbon dioxide into the atmosphere or too much nitrogen into our oceans is ludicrous. Scientific advances may yet serve to limit greenhouse gas emissions or protect the oceans, but so far science has moved us in the wrong direction. Human ingenuity is, at best, a two-edged sword.

Ellis insists that “The science of human sustenance is inherently a social science.” More hubris. The idea that the “social sciences” will enable us to feed another 3 billion more people without inflicting further harm to the soil and water that we depend upon for our long-term survival is, sadly, laughable. Soil degradation and erosion, deforestation, desertification, and the depletion of underground aquifers are clear and present dangers to our ability to feed ourselves. We ignore them at our peril.

Ellis concludes his opinion piece by saying that the “… the environment will be what we make it.” Well, he is correct on that account: the environment is what we make of it… and so far we are making an enormous mess of it.

Ellis, of course, is not the only person currently ‘debunking’ concerns about population and the ongoing destruction of the environment. Jonathan V. Last, who writes for the Weekly Standard, recently wrote a book [“What to Expect When No One’s Expecting”] that urges Americans to produce more babies in effort to avoid a “demographic disaster.” Just as there is a cluster of “climate-deniers,” there are perfectly intelligent people who absolutely refuse to recognize the obvious: we are taking more from the Earth than the Earth can sustainably regenerate. Sooner or later, we will face a day of environmental reckoning that no amount of human imagination will manage to stave off.

Healthy Living – The Huffington Post
2-Foot Blood Clot ‘Vacuumed’ Out Of Patient By UCLA Doctors
When a two-foot long blood clot, running from the legs and into the heart, threatened the life of 62-year-old California man Todd Dunlap, doctors at the University of California, Los Angeles, had two options.

The first: Open-heart surgery, which has a notoriously long heal-time after the procedure, and involves dividing the breastbone to gain access to the heart. The second: A minimally invasive procedure that “vacuums” the blood clot right out, but had never been performed before in California.

Dunlap underwent the second option — a three-hour procedure that was done with a device called an AngioVac — on Aug. 14. A week later, he was already able to go home.

“Once in place, the AngioVac quickly sucked the deadly clot out of Mr. Dunlap’s heart and filtered out the solid tissue,” Dr. John Moriarty, an interventional radiologist at the UCLA Medical Center, said in a statement. “The system then restored the cleansed blood through a blood vessel near the groin, eliminating the need for a blood transfusion.”

blood clot 1

blood clot 2

Photos courtesy of Dr. John Moriarty/UCLA

Doctors had previously tried giving Dunlap a clot-busting drug, called tPA, before the procedure, but it didn’t work because the clot was so big.

“The AngioVac was the last resort for Mr. Dunlap,” Moriarty said. “The clot clogged his heart chamber like a wad of gum in a pipe. Every moment that passed increased the risk that the clot would migrate to his lungs and kill him. We couldn’t have asked for a better outcome.”

Dunlap’s blood clot was caused by deep vein thrombosis, which is when blood clots form in the veins in the legs, and can occur when a person doesn’t move for long periods of time, is dehydrated, or is on birth control pills. The danger is when the blood clot breaks off and travels the the heart or lungs, which can cause death.

For more on the story, watch the clip from ABC7 above.

Communication: 8 Powerful Steps for Connection and Engagement
In my first year of junior high school, I shared four classes with a girl I had never met before. We talked and found out she lived close to my house. We became friends and enjoyed each other until she adopted me. I’d wake up on Saturday and Sunday mornings and she’d be in my backyard waiting. Actually it felt more like stalking.

Being the type of person who needs a little space in my relationships, her neediness began to smother me. At 12 years old, I was at an absolute loss as to how to tell her. So I didn’t. I simply stopped talking to her.

Now she was at a loss as to what happened. This all took place at the beginning of the year and considering we shared four classes together, it was a very long year. The next year she returned to private school and stayed until she graduated. Was my muteness part of her decision to leave public school?

At 12 years old, it was the only strategy I could think of. How could I tell her she had overstepped her boundaries? I was raised on “don’t hurt other people’s feelings” and “be nice.” The concept of setting personal boundaries was foreign to me.

Communication. Why is it so difficult? Over the years I’ve struggled to find my voice and the courage to speak with sincerity and honesty. My fear of being vulnerable and sharing from my feelings kept me in the “be nice” column far too long.

Today I speak from my feelings, where there is no game playing or deception. Yes, it can rock a few boats and shatter people’s vision of “she’s so sweet” and run the risk of rejection, but it has allowed me to develop many profoundly honest and treasured friendships.

Throughout the years, this is what I’ve learned regarding communication:

1. Become quiet. Quiet your mental chatter and move into your center, where your head and heart connect and work together. Allow enough light in to filter through the cobwebs of your mind, clearing away the debris of distrust, jealousy, resentment and judgment. Then you will speak with integrity and clarity.

2. Listen to your feelings. Don’t run from them, hide or discount them. Value and acknowledge how you feel and find the courage to express them. Honest communication spoken from the feeling level is empowering.

3. Listen carefully to another. Listen in silence to another. Listen with your heart. It truly sees, hears and understands. From your heart you will sense the essence of what people are saying and feeling. Then you can respond from a quiet pool of insight.

4. Speak to another with reverence and respect. You don’t even have to like the person or their behavior, but when you speak with respect to another, you honor their truth. In fact, you will help them to discover it.

5. Speak from your truth. Communicate your needs to another and be willing to listen to theirs. It’s a balancing act that requires honesty, patience and sometimes sacrifices. Are you willing to occasionally set aside your desires in the moment to allow the needs of another to be met?

6. Pay careful attention to the quality of energy behind your words. Your feelings and emotions fuel your thoughts and words. What an incredible power at your command when used for good. However, be aware that they can cause harm when stemming from carelessness and self-centeredness.

7. Seek the middle road. There is a natural flow of open communication between two people when both desire to understand and be understood. We all perceive life in our own unique way. Be patient when trying to understand someone. Don’t jump to conclusions. Don’t fall into the trap of your way is the best way — the only way. Life lived on a one-way street is very lonely.

8. Relinquish the need to be right. When you relinquish the need to be right, you create a safe place for all to enter — a place where there is no wrong or right, no wasted energy spent on proving “my way is better than yours.” Strive to become a serene harbor where others can find unconditional acceptance.

There you go. Just a few lessons I’ve learned along the way. And what about the young girl I stopped talking to? A few years later I was walking down the street and there she was. I looked at her, smiled and said a simple, “Hello.”

The lines of communication gently reopened.

For more by Susan Ann Darley click here.

For more on emotional wellness, click here.

GPS for the Soul – The Huffington Post
The Most Tranquil Rivers Around The World (PHOTOS)
The stress and strain of constantly being connected can sometimes take your life — and your well-being — off course. GPS For The Soul can help you find your way back to balance.

GPS Guides are our way of showing you what has relieved others’ stress in the hopes that you will be able to identify solutions that work for you. We all have de-stressing “secret weapons” that we pull out in times of tension or anxiety, whether they be photos that relax us or make us smile, songs that bring us back to our heart, quotes or poems that create a feeling of harmony, or meditative exercises that help us find a sense of silence and calm. We encourage you to look at the GPS Guide below, visit our other GPS Guides here, and share with us your own personal tips for finding peace, balance and tranquility.

Having a rough day? Let the simplistic peace of the water turn it around. The slow pace of a river and its soothing sound can bring a sense of tranquility, whether you’re in the middle of the forest or a bustling city.

As Henry David Thoreau once said, “He who hears the rippling of rivers in these degenerate days will not utterly despair.” The benefits of spending time in nature are endless, whether it’s soaking up some sun, or as a way to find your center. Take a moment of reflection and click through the slideshow below to find some relaxing rivers the world has to offer.

For more GPS Guides, click here.

Communication: 8 Powerful Steps for Connection and Engagement
In my first year of junior high school, I shared four classes with a girl I had never met before. We talked and found out she lived close to my house. We became friends and enjoyed each other until she adopted me. I’d wake up on Saturday and Sunday mornings and she’d be in my backyard waiting. Actually it felt more like stalking.

Being the type of person who needs a little space in my relationships, her neediness began to smother me. At 12 years old, I was at an absolute loss as to how to tell her. So I didn’t. I simply stopped talking to her.

Now she was at a loss as to what happened. This all took place at the beginning of the year and considering we shared four classes together, it was a very long year. The next year she returned to private school and stayed until she graduated. Was my muteness part of her decision to leave public school?

At 12 years old, it was the only strategy I could think of. How could I tell her she had overstepped her boundaries? I was raised on “don’t hurt other people’s feelings” and “be nice.” The concept of setting personal boundaries was foreign to me.

Communication. Why is it so difficult? Over the years I’ve struggled to find my voice and the courage to speak with sincerity and honesty. My fear of being vulnerable and sharing from my feelings kept me in the “be nice” column far too long.

Today I speak from my feelings, where there is no game playing or deception. Yes, it can rock a few boats and shatter people’s vision of “she’s so sweet” and run the risk of rejection, but it has allowed me to develop many profoundly honest and treasured friendships.

Throughout the years, this is what I’ve learned regarding communication:

1. Become quiet. Quiet your mental chatter and move into your center, where your head and heart connect and work together. Allow enough light in to filter through the cobwebs of your mind, clearing away the debris of distrust, jealousy, resentment and judgment. Then you will speak with integrity and clarity.

2. Listen to your feelings. Don’t run from them, hide or discount them. Value and acknowledge how you feel and find the courage to express them. Honest communication spoken from the feeling level is empowering.

3. Listen carefully to another. Listen in silence to another. Listen with your heart. It truly sees, hears and understands. From your heart you will sense the essence of what people are saying and feeling. Then you can respond from a quiet pool of insight.

4. Speak to another with reverence and respect. You don’t even have to like the person or their behavior, but when you speak with respect to another, you honor their truth. In fact, you will help them to discover it.

5. Speak from your truth. Communicate your needs to another and be willing to listen to theirs. It’s a balancing act that requires honesty, patience and sometimes sacrifices. Are you willing to occasionally set aside your desires in the moment to allow the needs of another to be met?

6. Pay careful attention to the quality of energy behind your words. Your feelings and emotions fuel your thoughts and words. What an incredible power at your command when used for good. However, be aware that they can cause harm when stemming from carelessness and self-centeredness.

7. Seek the middle road. There is a natural flow of open communication between two people when both desire to understand and be understood. We all perceive life in our own unique way. Be patient when trying to understand someone. Don’t jump to conclusions. Don’t fall into the trap of your way is the best way — the only way. Life lived on a one-way street is very lonely.

8. Relinquish the need to be right. When you relinquish the need to be right, you create a safe place for all to enter — a place where there is no wrong or right, no wasted energy spent on proving “my way is better than yours.” Strive to become a serene harbor where others can find unconditional acceptance.

There you go. Just a few lessons I’ve learned along the way. And what about the young girl I stopped talking to? A few years later I was walking down the street and there she was. I looked at her, smiled and said a simple, “Hello.”

The lines of communication gently reopened.

For more by Susan Ann Darley click here.

For more on emotional wellness, click here.

Climbing A Tree Could Be The Key To Happiness
By Rachel Nuwer for YouBeauty.com

For some two million years our hominin ancestors enjoyed a long-term relationship with Mother Nature. Up until about 10,000 years ago — a mere hiccup in evolutionary terms — our survival completely depended upon successfully negotiating her ups and downs. Though we grew apart, man still harbors a meaningful affinity for nature, an adaptive holdover, some scientists say, from prehistoric times.

More From YouBeauty:

The Beauty Of Rock Climbing

Hiking Boots Creativity

Beauty Treatments That Relieve Stress

Though it’s been centuries since we began substituting environmental reliance with human wit, researchers believe that nature left a deep evolutionary mark on our psyches. A growing body of scientific evidence links nature with health benefits, including a reduction in stress and disease and a heightened sense of overall wellbeing.

Until now, however, how nature affects our experience of immediate, in-the-moment happiness remained a more elusive question. “Most people would agree that natural environments are happier places than other places,” says George MacKerron, Ph.D., a lecturer in economics at the University of Sussex in the United Kingdom. “We know they’re lovely, but ultimately, we wanted to know: How lovely are they?”

In other words, can you measure nature’s immediate effect on happiness — right this second?

To quantify the mood boost (or lack thereof) of being in nature, MacKerron built an iPhone app called Mappiness that randomly checks in with users twice a day to see what they’re up to and how they’re doing. Users report whether they’re with friends, at the movies, at work, getting ready for bed or doing any of the other countless activities that consume our waking hours. They also share how they feel at the moment by ranking their happiness on a sliding scale, ranging from “not at all” (i.e. hating the world) at one end to “extremely” (utter karmic bliss) at the other.

Around 20,000 people installed the app and provided more than 1.1 million data points over a period of six months. The app automatically paired responses with local weather data and GPS coordinates. A computer program classified those coordinates’ corresponding nature-y-ness using images taken from Google Earth. “The happiness measure is subjective, but everything else — the satellite classifiers, the data — was highly objective,” MacKerron says.

Nature did not disappoint. Even after controlling for variables like weather, day of the week, activities and company, natural environments provided significantly more moments of happiness than urban ones, MacKerron and his co-author report in the journal Global Environmental Change. On a scale of zero (least happy) to 100 (most happy), being in nature tended to add an extra three to six points to the baseline average of 66 — a boost equivalent to the difference between doing housework and going to a museum. Coastal environments ranked highest of the natural settings, especially among women — along with woodlands and farms. Other activities that prompted a happiness boost of a similar magnitude included hanging out with a partner or friend, and exercising or playing sports. “The best thing is to be in trees with your friends,” MacKerron says.

Aside from evolutionary throwbacks, he explains, our affinity with nature may also have something to do with natural environments’ relative purity. Navigating amidst honking horns and the reek of rotting garbage on a crowded New York City street is no doubt more stressful an experience than breathing in the sweet air of a forest or meadow. “It’s quieter and more peaceful in nature, and also lower in various bad characteristics — particularly noise and pollution,” MacKerron says. “Perhaps we’re evolved to like natural environments because they’re good for us.”

The study does leave some unanswered questions. One of its drawbacks is its geographic fuzziness — a single tree would not register as nature, for example — so the researchers cannot say what the minimum green area is that a person needs to feel happier. Nor can they tell how long you have to spend among the trees to reap the benefits. Still, there is hope for urbanites who have access to parks and gardens. Though squarely in the middle of the city, Hyde Park in London registers as a mix of grasslands, trees and water. And lo and behold, people were happier when they were in it.

Since most of the people who participated in the study live in urban environments, it’s hard to say whether those who live or work in the country get as much of a thrill from basking in the great outdoors as green-starved city dwellers who normally spend their time trapped in a cubicle. Generally speaking, research finds that country folk have higher levels of life satisfaction than city folk, but there are too many factors involved to understand the relationship.

The lesson should not be “Green is great, cities are bad,” warns Mirko Moro, Ph.D., a lecturer in economics at the University of Stirling in Scotland who was not involved in the research. “Most people still want to live in big cities,” he points out. “Cities offer the most opportunities to exchange ideas and experience culture.”

Rather than ditch your successful career and city friends in favor of a life of bliss in the country, he says, “Whenever you have some time off, just try to go outside in a green space and you’ll probably feel much better.” While a trek to the Catskills or Yosemite would be ideal, an afternoon jogging along the Hudson River or reading in Golden Gate Park should also do the trick. Even the busiest urbanite can still pen a happiness boost into her schedule by taking her next coffee break in the park.

Good News – The Huffington Post
Baby Elephant Tries, Tries, Tries To Wake Up Sleeping Dog (VIDEO)
Despite a baby elephant’s best efforts, this dog will not wake up. He is out like a rock, and nothing (we mean nothing) will interrupt his slumber. Not the rooster calls, not the frond-waving human and especially not his personal baby elephant alarm clock.

Oh well. Sweet dreams.

Via Tastefully Offensive.

#alkalinity #alkalinitymovement #7.2 #sevenpointtwo

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